Awards

The Eleventh Annual Research and Creative Activities Poster and Performance Day Award Recipients

The eleventh annual Research and Creative Activities Poster and Performance Day was held April 13, 2017. Around 200 students, faculty, and staff attended this celebration of the research and creative works done by WMU graduate students. There were 48 poster presentations representing 19 departments from across the University. The 33 faculty judges had the difficult task of scoring the presentations. Seventeen students, listed below, were awarded a monetary prize for their outstanding poster presentations. Congratulations!

  • Ama Agyeiwaa Abrokwah, Economics
  • Ahmed Sulaiman M Alharbi, Computer Science
  • Hasnaa Imad Al-Shaikhli, Computer Science
  • Ruth Bates-Hill, Public Affairs and Administration
  • Andrew Phillip Keller Bentley, Science Education
  • Ryan P. Castillo, Sociology
  • Cynthia Anne Cooley-Themm, Biological Sciences
  • Ryan Filbin, Geography
  • Katie Gaviglio, Chemical and Paper Engineering
  • Erin Grabarczyk, Biological Sciences
  • Jagjit Kaur, Physics
  • Megan Kuk, Industrial and Entrepreneurial Engineering and Engineering Management
  • Robert Makin, Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Daniel Abraham Mengistu, Economics
  • Frank Ofori, Economics
  • Lusanni Acosta Rodriguez, Civil and Construction Engineering
  • Qi Zhang, Educational Leadership, Research and Technology

 

Dissertation Completion Fellowships Announced

The Graduate College is pleased to announce that three WMU doctoral students have been named recipients of Dissertation Completion Fellowships for the 2017–18 academic year. The 2017–18 Dissertation Completion Fellowship recipients are as follows:

Steffany Comfort Maher – Department of English
Steffany Comfort Maher will receive a full-year fellowship for her dissertation titled, A Critical Inquiry Approach to Teaching Young Adult Literature. Dr. Allen Webb, Steffany’s dissertation advisor, writes that Steffany is “one of the finest doctoral students I have worked with in my 25 years at WMU,” and he concludes that her research will make critical contributions to the field of English education. The dissertation concerns pedagogical approaches to teaching literature to young adults and will take the form of a book that English teachers can purchase and that also can be used as a text book for courses that prepare students for the classroom or that can be incorporated into courses for the continuing professional. According to Dr. Webb, there are professional books about teaching literature to young adults; however, these books lack the foundation of classroom research. Steffany’s textbook for preservice teachers will draw upon an inquiry approach and will also utilize new research in critical youth studies, as well as draw upon secondary classroom settings: thus, the dissertation, and the resulting book, will coalesce in these three important intersections. Steffany is a certified secondary English teacher, with 12 years of experience in middle and high school classrooms; four years of teaching at the college level; and expertise in qualitative and classroom research. She is the recipient of several department level and Graduate College travel grants to present her work at national conferences.

Bilge N. Altay – Department of Chemical and Paper Engineering
Bilge Altay will receive a full-year fellowship for her dissertation titled Development and Characterization of Nano Nickel-based Conductive Inks for the Flexo Printing of Printed Electronic Devices. Her dissertation advisor, Dr. Paul Fleming, writes that she is an “outstanding student who has already made significant accomplishments in research.” Bilge’s research is partially supported by the Rossini Scholarship from the Flexographic Technical Association. Her work involves “the study of nickel, an abundant metal with high electrical conductivity. Less expensive than silver and gold, its magnetic properties open up a new class of printed electronic devices, including wireless power, electromagnetic sensors, proximity sensors and micro magnetic field sources,” writes Dr. Fleming. Her work will contribute to the quickly growing technology of Printed Electronics. Bilge is the author or co-author of 14 peer-reviewed articles and has presented her work at both national and international conference venues. She has varied professional experiences and has worked as a research associate on an NSF-funded project, as well as taught within laboratory and classroom settings. She also taught printing for the Department of Printing and Publication Technologies at Kadir Has University in Istanbul, and in the Graphic Communications Department at California Polytechnic State University, in San Luis Obispo, CA. She is an active member of the Graduate Student Association and has served as a Graduate College Graduate Ambassador.

Jason Vanfosson – Department of English
Jason Vanfossen will receive a full-year fellowship to complete his dissertation titled Boys On the Road: Childhood Geographies and (Auto) Mobility in Young Adult Road Novels. Dr. Gwen Tarbox, Jason’s dissertation advisor, writes that this work “advances scholarship in the fields of children’s literature, LGBTQ studies, and disability studies.” The study works from the essential concept that the North American road trip has historically served as a rite of passage, primarily for young, white cisgender men. Jason “identifies the characteristics of literary fiction that celebrate life on the road in texts such as Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Jack Kerouac’s On the Road, and then considers how those characteristics have altered when they appear in contemporary novels written for young people and focused on members of underrepresented groups,” writes Dr. Tarbox. Jason is considered one of the finest teachers in the Department of English and recently was awarded the Edward Galligan Scholarship, a prestigious award given to the student who displays the most promise as a scholar working on American authors. Moreover, he is the 2017 recipient of the Gwen Raaberg Excellence in Teaching Award. His reputation has soared beyond the Department of English and beyond WMU. Jason’s road trip narrative has garnered the attention of executives at PBS, and, after a nationwide search, Jason and two other Ph.D. candidates will travel across the United States in May 2017, interviewing other Ph.D. holders who are doing innovative work in their respective fields. The documentary will air in Fall 2017, and according to Dr. Tarbox, will “bring welcome recognition to him and to Western Michigan University.”

Printable .pdf of the 2017–18 Dissertation Completion Fellowship recipients 

 

2017 Patricia Lee Thompson Dissertation Award Announced

The Graduate College is pleased to announce that two WMU doctoral students have been named recipients of the Patricia Lee Thompson Dissertation Award for the 2017–18 academic year. The Patricia Lee Thompson Dissertation Awards are funded generously from Dr. Donald Thompson, former WMU vice president for research and dean of the Graduate College. Awards are given to assist recipients in all fields of study with expenses associated with the dissertation. The 2017–18 Patricia L. Thompson Dissertation Award recipients:

Peggy Mansfield McNeal - Mallinson Institute for Science Education
Peggy Mansfield McNeal will receive the Patricial L. Thompson Dissertation Award for her dissertation titled, Cognitive Processing in Atmospheric Science: An Investigation of the Forecasting Process. Her dissertation advisor, Dr. Heather Petcovic, writes that Peggy has distinguished herself as an evolutionary researcher, not only within the Mallinson Institute, but also more broadly, in the field of earth science education. Peggy’s research “involves an interdisciplinary approach that blends cognitive science with atmospheric science education and explores the role of discrete intelligence abilities, knowledge, and expertise in weather forecasting.” At the present time, there are no best practices in place to teach weather forecasting to undergraduate students because, as Dr. Petcovic states, “we simply do not know what types of cognitive abilities are involved, or which abilities are more critical than others.” Peggy’s research is of special significance, for the act of predicting weather can help forecasters to warn populations of imminent danger. The primary purpose of her research is to impart an understanding of five discrete intelligence abilities on weather forecasting skill and to characterize the interplay between them. Peggy will also develop a qualitative process model that describes how individuals solve weather forecast problems. An awardee of the Joseph P. Stoltman Endowed Scholarship, Peggy is also the recipient of a Graduate Student Travel Grant, sponsored by the Graduate College. She has presented her work at the WMU Research and Creative Activities Poster and Performance Day, and at professional conferences.

Rebecca Straple – Department of English
Rebecca Straple will receive the Patricia L. Thompson Dissertation Award for her dissertation titled, Movement and Meaning in Old English and Old Norse-Icelandic Literature. Her dissertation advisor, Dr. Jana Schulman, writes that Rebecca’s research is “noteworthy” and that it will contribute to the “scholarship of Anglo-Saxon and Old Norse-Icelandic literature because of her interdisciplinary approach and application of kinesics [the study of bodily movement] to these literatures.” Rebecca’s excellence was recognized in the award of a prestigious grant to attend the 2017 Humanities Without Walls PreDoctoral Workshop. In addition, she has participated in eight conferences and also organized panels at the WMU International Congress on Medieval Studies. Moreover, she is the recipient of a Graduate College Graduate Student Travel Grant to present a paper at Leeds. Convinced of Rebecca’s organizational skills and exemplary work ethic, Dr. Schulman chose Rebecca to assist her in the administration of a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institute grant. As part of this experience, Rebecca wrote a book chapter on digital resources for teaching Beowulf. Working within an established gap in the scholarship – one that recognizes that descriptions of bodily movements are less common in early medieval literature than in later medieval literature, Rebecca works within a broader definition of movement than that used in previous studies of gesture and movement in early medieval literature. She is currently conducting a comparative study of how and when bodily movement is depicted in Old English and Old Norse-Icelandic literature and then analyzes the possible communicative, symbolic, literary, social or cultural meanings of those movements.

Printable .pdf of the 2017 Patricia Lee Thompson Dissertation Award recipients 

 

March 2017 Gwen Frostic Doctoral Fellowship Recipients Announced

The Graduate College is pleased to announce that three WMU doctoral students have been named recipients of Gwen Frostic Doctoral Fellowships for the 2017–18 academic year. The Gwen Frostic Doctoral Fellowships are funded generously from an endowment made possible by the late poet, artist, and naturalist, Gwen Frostic, a WMU alumna, Class of 1929. Awards are given to assist recipients with the completion of the doctoral dissertation in all disciplines. The 2017–18 Gwen Frostic Doctoral Fellowships recipients are as follows:

Basil Ahmed – Department of Chemistry
Basil M. Ahmed will receive the Gwen Frostic Doctoral Fellowship for his dissertation titled, NANOJARS: Versatile Platform for the Discovery of Novel Reactivity, Properties and Selective Extraction of Anions. According to his advisor, Dr. Gellert Mezei, Basil’s research “ addresses the need for selective anion extraction agents for the efficient removal of harmful or toxic anions from industrial and agricultural wastes, contaminated lakes and rivers, and also of those anions that interfere with certain technological processes. “The research group to which Basil belongs has recently developed a new class of anion encapsulating agents, termed nanojars, which demonstrate a high affinity for various anions of interest, including highly toxic arsenate and chromate ions,” writes Dr. Mezei. Basil, a fifth year doctoral student, has published 10 journal articles in peer-reviewed journals, all of which have high impact factors, high citation indexes, and low acceptance rates. Basil is not only a researcher but also a teacher who has trained six undergraduate students, as well as two high school students in Dr. Mezei’s research laboratory. Dr. Mezei considers him a “fast learner and a very dedicated researcher,” who has become a “master of various synthesis and characterization/instrumentation techniques and has demonstrated an excellent work ethic.” Upon graduation, Basil will continue his research and explore possibilities as a tenure track professor, where he will lend his skills to the education and cultivation of future researchers.

Tai-Hsien Wu – Department of Paper and Chemical Engineering
Tai-Hsien Wu will receive the Gwen Frostic Doctoral Fellowship for his dissertation research titled, A3D Simulation of Leukocyte Adhesion in Blood Flow. His advisor, Dr. Dewei Qi, writes that Tai-Hsien is a “talented and motivated researcher who has already made a solid contribution to academic research and whose exceptional work will inform multiple disciplines in ways that join scientific inquiry with humanitarian goals.” His current research will study the critical link of inflammation, as a disease-provoking agent, to such illnesses as cancer and cardio vascular disease. This work will establish three goals: 1. The creation of a highly realistic simulation approach, based on the integration of several numerical models for the phenomenon of WBC adhesion in blood flow; 2. The investigation of the fundamental mechanism of influences on the geometries and elasticity of vessel walls, and 3. The development of parallel computing implementations to accelerate the computing speed of the simulations. The research will bring forth a deeper understanding of the complex interactional dynamics among blood cells, blood flow, and vessel walls in the circulation system. As an evolving scholar, Tai-Hsien has a total of 5 manuscripts currently under review in peer-reviewed journals and has presented his research at 12 national and international conferences. His work will make exhilarating and significant contributions to the multidisciplinary fields of chemical engineering, computer science, and bio-engineering.

John Byczynski – Department of History
John Byczynski will receive the Gwen Frostic Doctoral Fellowship for his dissertation research titled, Everyday Lives of Capitalism: Crow Wing County, Minnesota, 1750 – 1950. Dr. Eli Rubin, John’s dissertation advisor, describes John’s dissertation as written in the style of the longue duree, studying one place as it changes and evolves throughout multiple centuries of time, and derived from the French school of historical thought known as the Annales school in the 1930s – 50s. “This style stems from a reawakening across multiple disciplines of the importance of the environment, and the interaction between long term human processes… and ecological processes,” writes Dr. Rubin. John’s research will contribute to an understanding of the rural Midwest and the tide of capitalism as a gateway that leads to a cogent understanding from socio-political and economic perspectives, among others. Historians liken the Midwest to a “foreign country,” a place lost to historical inquiry – a dead zone in terms of the history of the United States. This research will use a case study approach to unmask the key components of capitalism, fur trade, railroads, the lumber industry, agriculture, mining, tourism, and place them into the context of one narrative that sheds light on the rural Midwest and, more importantly, the role of the rural Midwest within the context of the history of the United States and in the evolution of capitalism.

Printable .pdf of the March 2017 Gwen Frostic Doctoral Fellowship recipients 

 

2016-17 Graduate Research and Creative Scholar Awards

The Graduate College, the Graduate Studies Council, and the Graduate Student Association are proud to announce the 2016–17 recipients of the Graduate Research and Creative Scholar Awards at Western Michigan University 

The All-University Scholars for 2016–17

Doctoral Level

  • Basil Ahmed, Chemistry
  • Elizabeth MacQuillan, Interdisciplinary Health Sciences
  • Neil Deochand, Psychology
  • Zeinab Ramshani, Electrical and Computer Engineering

Master’s Level

  • Nicholas P. Cherup, Human Performance and Health Education
  • Alexandra C. Ferguson, Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Kevin E. Kerr, Music
  • Austin J. Beattie, Communication

The Department Scholars for 2016–17

Doctoral Level

  • Ama Agyeiwaa Abrokwah, Economics
  • Bilge Nazli Altay, Chemical and Paper Engineering
  • Hazim Al-Zubaidi, Chemistry
  • Stephanie R. Bobbitt, Counselor Education Counseling Psychology
  • Jialiang Chang, Computer Science
  • McKenna N. Corlis, Psychology
  • Neil Deochand, Psychology
  • Mustafa Kemal Emil, Geosciences
  • Anna Marie Fontaine, Special Education and Literacy Studies
  • Nizoramo Haitova, Educational Leadership Research and Technology
  • Ruiqi Huang, Biological Sciences
  • Jagjit Kaur, Physics
  • James R. MacDonald, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
  • Elizabeth L. MacQuillan, Interdisciplinary Health Sciences
  • Kara D. McGregor, Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences
  • Peggy Mansfield McNeal, Mallinson Institute for Science Education
  • Drake P. Olejniczak, Mathematics
  • Daniel J. Patten, Sociology
  • Ricky J. Pope, Counselor Education Counseling Psychology
  • Zeinab Ramshani, Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Rebecca Straple, English
  • Dawid Tatarczyk, Political Science
  • Rachael E. Tilka, Psychology
  • Aimee Valentine, English
  • Mustafa Yildiz, Educational Leadership Research and Technology

Master’s Level

  • Baya Najat O H Aljubairi, Educational Leadership Research and Technology
  • Stephanie N. Barron, Teaching, Learning and Educational Studies
  • Austin J. Beattie, Communication
  • Charlie Bouverette, Comparative Religion
  • Abbie K .Brackman, Chemical and Paper Engineering
  • Ryan P. Castillo, Sociology
  • Margaret Daphne Cattenhead, Teaching, Learning and Educational Studies
  • Nicholas P. Cherup, Human Performance and Health Education
  • Haley R. Ferguson, Counselor Education Counseling Psychology
  • Alexandra C. Ferguson, Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Amy J. Gill, Counselor Education Counseling Psychology
  • Fadwa Hamad, Chemistry
  • Matthew A. Hemenway, Geosciences
  • Kevin E. Kerr, Music
  • Jeremy Killion, History
  • Dinesh Maddipatla, Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Katherine L. Merren, Teaching, Learning and Educational Studies
  • Claire Robbins, English
  • Alberto Fernández Diego Rodriguez, Spanish
  • Hope E. Sholtis, Counselor Education Counseling Psychology
  • Samantha Leigh Theall, Chemical and Paper Engineering
  • Andrew Thomas, English
  • Andrew W. Verstraete, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
  • Jacob A. Watkins, Geography
  • Ryan L. Wessendorf, Biological Science

Printable .pdf of the 2016–17 recipients of the Graduate Research and Creative Scholar Awards  

2017 Graduate Teaching Effectiveness Awards

The Graduate College, the Graduate Studies Council, and the Graduate Student Association are proud to announce the 2016–17 recipients of the Graduate Teaching Effectiveness Awards at Western Michigan University

The All-University Graduate Teachers for 2016–17

Doctoral Level

  • Cameron J. Manche, Geosciences
  • Robert A. Makin III, Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Kristina Bailey, Political Science
  • Christopher D. Duchesneau, Mallinson Institute for Science Education
  • Shawn R. Brueshaber, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Master’s Level

  • Ryan Filbin, Geography
  • Margaret E. Baker, Communication
  • Kristina L. Riewaldt, Music
  • Jair C. Stout, Comparative Religion
  • Erin S. Lynch, Medieval Institute

The Department Graduate Teachers for 2016–17

Doctoral Level

  • Jerico Alcantara, Chemical and Paper Engineering
  • Kristina R. Bailey, Political Science
  • Shawn R. Brueshaber, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
  • Timothy Conrad, English
  • Erin E. Grabarczyk, Biological Sciences
  • Aous Hammad Kurdi, Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Ruoxi Ma, Chemical and Paper Engineering
  • Robert A. Makin III, Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Cameron J. Manche, Geosciences
  • Tara Maser, Chemistry
  • Keli Masten, English
  • Tristan D. McBain, Counselor Education Counseling Psychology
  • Somaia Mustafa, Educational Leadership Research and Technology
  • Jennifer O'Brien, Mathematics
  • Todd R. Sarnstrom II, Economics
  • Michelle A. Stahl, Counselor Education Counseling Psychology
  • Madhushani W. Wickramarathna, Physics
  • Allison Michelle Witucki, Mallinson Institute for Science Education

Master's Level

  • Ruth A. Aardsma-Benton, History
  • Margaret E. Baker, Communication
  • Diana L. Carter, Biological Sciences
  • Ryan P. Castillo, Sociology
  • Danielle R. Dupuis, Geosciences
  • Meghan E. Feeman, Music
  • Claudia S. Ferreyra, Spanish
  • Ryan Filbin, Geography
  • Michael A. Gause, Music
  • Katie M. Gaviglio, Chemical and Paper Engineering
  • Fadwa Hamad, Chemistry
  • Laura L. Hinkley, Counselor Education Counseling Psychology
  • Sarah Kidd, English
  • Gerrit J. Van Klaveren, Human Performance and Health Education
  • Meredith A. Landon, Bronson School of Nursing
  • Erin S. Lynch, Medieval Institute
  • Colin MacCreery, Computer Science
  • Benjamin H. de Waal Malefyt, Human Performance and Health Education
  • Marissa B. Messenger, Counselor Education Counseling Psychology
  • Bridget E. Miller, Human Performance and Health Education
  • Piyush Prakash Pokharna, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
  • Jeff W. Powless, Counselor Education Counseling Psychology
  • Kristina L. Riewaldt, Music
  • Brianna M. Scott, Counselor Education Counseling Psychology
  • Jair Stout, Comparative Religion
  • Darcy Sturges, English
  • Liliya Vansovich, Counselor Education Counseling Psychology
  • Kara M. Woodshank, Family and Consumer Sciences

Printable .pdf of the 2016-17 Graduate Teaching Effectiveness Award Recipients 

 

January 2017 Graduate Student Research and Travel Grant Award Recipients Announced

The Graduate College congratulates the following graduate students who are the recipients of the January 2017 Graduate Student Research and Travel Grant awards and wishes them continued success in their research.

 The Research Grant Recipients for January 2017:

  • Mohammad Al Qaralleh, Civil and Construction Engineering
  • Jerico Alcantara, Chemical and Paper Engineering
  • Gabriel Alves, Biological Sciences
  • Jesse Anguiano, Interdisciplinary Studies
  • Elise Drager, Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences
  • Danielle Dupuis, Geosciences
  • Meghan Feeman, Music Therapy
  • Eric Harvey, Psychology
  • Sarut Jianrattanasawat, Chemistry
  • Ian Kells, Music Therapy
  • Alexander Koerber, Geosciences
  • Anilkumar Kosna, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
  • Sarah Kourtjian, Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences
  • Alexander Luck, Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences
  • Danielle Molenaar, Geography
  • Thomas Ratkos, Psychology
  • Emily Sprague, Biological Sciences
  • Brian Trude, English
  • Vikram Turkani, Electrical and Computer Engineering

The Travel Grant Recipients for January 2017:

  • Ayaz Akram, Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Subodh Bansode, Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Maime Butler, Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology
  • Li Cheng, Public Affairs and Administration
  • Kelley Current, Chemistry
  • James Dawson, Educational Leadership, Research and Technology
  • Mustafa Emil, Geosciences
  • Thomas Groves, Biological Sciences
  • Mohammed Hussain, Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • James MacDonald, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
  • Patrick Marcoux, Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology
  • Mehdi Mohammadi, Computer Science
  • Drake Olejniczak, Mathematics
  • Kristin Roberts, Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology
  • Jaliya Samarakoon, Chemistry
  • Erica Schlau, Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology
  • Paige Schoenborn, Educational Leadership, Research and Technology
  • Vicki Van Patten, Educational Leadership, Research and Technology

Printable .pdf of the January 2017 Graduate Research and Travel Grant Award Recipients

 

November 2016 Gwen Frostic Doctoral Fellowship Recipients Announced

The Graduate College is pleased to announce that three WMU doctoral students have been named recipients of Gwen Frostic Doctoral Fellowships for the 2016–17 academic year. The Gwen Frostic Doctoral Fellowships are funded generously from an endowment made possible by the late poet, artist, and naturalist, Gwen Frostic, a WMU alumna, Class of 1929. Awards are given to assist recipients with the completion of the doctoral dissertation in all disciplines.

The 2016–17 Gwen Frostic Doctoral Fellowships recipients are as follows:

Mohammed Aledhari – Department of Computer Science: Mohammed Aledhari will receive the Gwen Frostic Doctoral Fellowship for his dissertation, “Customize Content-Encoding of Network Transfer Protocols to Speedup of IoT Big Data Transfer.” Mohammed’s research in the area known as the Internet of Things (IoT) will establish the first eyes-like microcontroller-based device for visually impaired people by using sensor, microcontroller, machine learning, and image processing techniques. The research will assess the limitations and challenges of electronics in simulating the lived experiences of visually impaired individuals. It will also address the accuracy of localization algorithms. Eventually the research will be extended to other disciplines. His dissertation advisor, Dr. Fahad Saeed, acknowledges the significance of this proposed research and states that the “development of smart eyes-like sensors and microcontrollers will potentially serve approximately 280 million visually impaired patients and enhance their quality of life, safety, and well-being.” Mohammed has published two conference proceedings paper and one journal paper that surveys various IoT areas. Dr. Saeed describes this research as “innovative” and writes that “Such advances rest in accord with the evolutionary contexts of electronic health services (EHS) and the Internet of Things (IoT). After graduation with his Ph.D., Mohammed aspires to be an educator and is considering a career as a tenure-track professor, where he will continue his research, as well as lend his skills to the education and cultivation of future researchers.

James L. Dawson – Department of Educational Leadership: James Dawson will receive the Gwen Frostic Doctoral Fellowship for his dissertation research titled, “Justice Involved Veterans Post-Release Employment Experiences.” James’ research will make a significant contribution to the field by assisting veterans and Veteran Services Agencies in working with incarcerated veterans by transitioning these individuals into career tech educational programs despite the challenges and barriers they may face as a result of their criminal backgrounds. Dawson's research on Justice Involved Veterans shows that 10% of those individuals incarcerated in state and federal prisons have a U.S. military service background. Researchers indicate that “These veterans may be at greater risk of incarceration than men in the general population as a result of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) but also from difficulties reintegrating into civilian society after extensive periods away from civilian employment and supportive social networks.” Currently, there is only minimal qualitative and quantitative research available on this topic, and the results in evaluating veterans’ employment experiences, post release, will inform policy makers, vocational educators, and the Veterans Administration, as well as criminal justice professionals, among others. According to Dr. Richard Zinser, James’ dissertation advisor, this project “has the potential to make a substantial contribution to the field via peer-reviewed publication, and will likely include a set of recommendations for several Michigan agencies related to veterans, education, and employment.”

Niluka Dissanayake – Department of Chemistry: Niluka Dissanayake will receive the Gwen Frostic Doctoral Fellowship for her dissertation research titled, “Strategies to Elucidate the Stability and Toxicity of Nanoparticles Exposed to Various Contaminants”. Niluka’s research will focus on understanding the environmental impact of anthropogenic nanoparticles that have increasingly appeared in consumer products and will examine their stability and toxicity in the presence of other contaminants. The study will determine how nanoparticles impact bacteria and also will examine what mutagenic effects arise: some mutated bacteria may be antiobiotic resistant. The contaminants are considered “high-risk emerging contaminants” that may impact other organisims in the ecosystem. The toxic effects of these iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) are of interest to researchers, especially as their use in medical and industrial applications increases, thereby resulting in significant environmental and health concerns. According to Dr. Sherine O Bare, Niluka’s dissertation advisor, the goal of the study is to “develop a fundamental understanding of how nanoparticle structure…can influence their behavior when in contact with contaminants common in the environment… Consequently, these emerging contaminants will make their way into the environment, yet their toxicity and environmental impact is not well understood.” Niluka is first author in a prestigious journal, International Journal of Molecular Science, 2015, and aspires to be an educator.

November 2016 Gwen Frostic Doctoral Fellowship recipients printable .pdf

September 2016 Graduate Student Research and Travel Grant Award recipients announced

The Graduate College congratulates the following graduate student who received the September 2016 Graduate Student Research and Travel Grant awards and wishes them continued success in their research.

The Research Grant Recipients for September 2016

  • Ruth A. Aardsma-Benton, History
  • Mohammed Aledhari, Computer Science
  • Neil Deochand, Psychology
  • Erin E. Grabarczyk, Biological Sciences
  • Shelby H. Hurst, Geosciences
  • Angela I. Kennedy-Mendez, Biological Sciences
  • Robert J. Kohler, Psychology
  • Ziqian Li, Geosciences
  • Nicholas W. Martin, Biological Sciences
  • Peggy M. McNeal, Mallinson Institute for Science Education

The Travel Grant Recipients for September 2016

  • Ayaz Akram, Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Miriam A. Carrol-Alfano, Interdisciplinary Health Science
  • Amer Abdulmahdi Chlaihawi, Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Alexandra Ferguson, Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Jagjit Kaur, Physics
  • Pathirannehelage Kumara, Physics
  • Kate S. Kirkton, Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences
  • David S. La Mantia, Physics
  • Joanna Pozzuto, Biological Sciences
  • Cody T. Williams, Mallinson Institute for Science Education
  • Angela M. Willson, Mallinson Institute for Science Education
  • Tai-Hsien Wu, Chemical and Paper Engineering
  • Funda Yavuz, Civil and Construction Engineering

September 2016 Graduate Student Research and Travel Grant awardees printable .pdf

April 2016 Graduate Student Research and Travel Grant award recipients announced 

The Graduate College congratulates the following graduate student who received the April 2016 Graduate Student Research and Travel Grant awards. We wish them continued success in their research.
The Research Grant Recipients for April 2016
  • Mohammad Ali Abu Shattal- Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Skylar Bre’z - History
  • Javon M. Dobbs -- School of Public Affairs and Administration
  • Brianna L. Forbis – Psychology
  • Sita Karki – Geosciences
  • Thomas J. Maurer – History
  • Matthew D. Penix – History
  • Julie E. Polcrack – Medieval Studies
  • Joshua K. Radi – Interdisciplinary Health Studies
  • Matthew J. Rine – Geosciences
The Travel Grant Recipients for April 2016
  • Basil Mohammed Ahmed – Chemistry
  • Ahmed J. Al Bayati – Civil and Construction Engineering
  • Wisam Abdulabbas Flayyih Al Isawi – Chemistry
  • Bilge Nazli Altay – Chemical and Paper Engineering
  • Megan Melissa Arnott – English
  • Monica Barreto – Psychology
  • Nicole E. Bauer – Psychology
  • Tyler W. Bayne – Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Carol L. Beaver – Biological Sciences
  • Joshua R. Berkenpas – Political Science
  • Alicia M. Boynton – Biological Sciences
  • Andrew J. Bulla – Psychology
  • Diana L. Carter – Biological Sciences
  • Jonathan D. Garrett – Geosciences
  • Michael J. Joyce – Chemical and Paper Engineering
  • Joy V. Langereis – Social Work
April 2016 Graduate Student Research and Travel Grant award recipients printable .pdf
 

Graduate College Announces the Recipients of 2016 Western Michigan University Dames Endowed Scholarship

 
The Graduate College is pleased to announce that three students have been awarded a WMU Dames Endowed Scholarship. First awarded in 1997 in accordance with an agreement made between Western Michigan University and the WMU Women’s Association, the scholarship is offered on a competitive basis to exceptional graduate students enrolled in a graduate degree program at WMU. Both men and women may apply for this scholarship, but by the terms of the agreement, preference is given to women. The scholarship funds are restricted to the following elements only: tuition payment, fees, and the purchase of books.
 
Karina Ortiz-Paccheco - Department of Spanish
Karina is a doctoral student with the Department of Spanish and anticipates completing her degree in 2016. She is actively engaged in the life of the University, serving as an adjunct instructor and also as Spanish Assistant Coordinator, developing professional activities for graduate students and developing tests and examinations. Karina also won the Department of Spanish 2015 Department-Level Graduate Research and Creative Scholar Award, as well as the 2013 Department-Level Graduate Teaching Effectiveness Award. Dr. Irma Lopez, Department Chair and also Karina’s dissertation chair, writes that Karina has “always been praised by her professors,” who acknowledge her intellectual talents and her dedication to graduate study and research. Karina’s dissertation research is focused on developing a narrative of five 21st Century Ecuadorian women writers.
 
Shacara Burrell - School of Social Work
Shacara is a master’s student in the School of Social Work, currently completing her degree. She plans on beginning her Juris Doctorate with Cooley Law School in 2016. Shacara is dedicated to working with vulnerable populations of women and children, and has training in the areas of substance abuse, alcohol, and sexual abuse prevention. She is engaged in community outreach and has worked on the United Way Health Impact Team, as well as served on the Kalamazoo Child Abuse and Neglect Council. Her professional career trajectory reflects her dedication to the cultivation of health and well-being in others. Dr. Dolly Daftary describes Shacara’s commitment to pursue knowledge which will “promote social justice and empowerment for women, children, and families.” Shacara’s work and life goals reflect an individual who is acutely aware of the centrality of shaping human well being through policy, as well as through a commitment to social responsibility - to enact change and social justice via the law.
 
Laura Pacheco del Castillo - Department of Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology
Laura is a doctoral student with the Department of Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology. She is currently completing her internship at Texas A &M University and will return to WMU in the summer to complete her dissertation. Her research is titled “Dominican College Students’ Experiences of Distress, Help-Seeking and Stigma,” and according to Dr. Joseph Morris, Laura’s dissertation chair, this research is “significant because it will provide much needed information to guide counseling-related services on college campuses in the Dominican Republic.” Laura has presented her work at professional conferences and associations and contributed to research in invaluable ways. Dr. Morris recognizes Laura’s unique leadership qualities which have emerged through her dedication to research and through a myriad of contributions she has made to the University.
 

 Dissertation Completion Fellowships Announced

The Graduate College is pleased to announce that three WMU doctoral students have been named recipients of Dissertation Completion Fellowships for the 2016–17 academic year.

The 2016–17 Dissertation Completion Fellowship recipients are as follows:

Abotalib Z.A. Farag – Department of Geoscience: Abotalib will receive a full-year fellowship for his dissertation, “An Integrated Approach For a Better Understanding of the Paleo-Hydrology and Landscape Evolution in the Sahara During the Previous Wet Climatic Periods.” He has authored or co-authored six articles for publication in peer-reviewed journals, distinguished by their high impact factors, and currently has three manuscripts in preparation. Abotalib’s research is focused on the implementation of cost effective, interdisciplinary, collaborative research that proffers insight into the role of groundwater on Mars. Moreover, he writes that the research may assess “the possibility of recent or ancient life on Mars by applying a comparative analysis between outflow channels and RSL (recurring slope linea) on Mars and their terrestrial counterparts in the Sahara.” Dr. Mohamed Sultan, Chair of the Department of Geosciences and Abotalib’s dissertation chair, describes his protégé as an “interdisciplinary scientist” who employs his vast background in geology, as well as in remote sensing and GIS applications and brings the best of these varied disciplines to his current research. Abotalib will be honored at the Awards Ceremony on April 28th, when he receives the All-University Graduate Research and Creative Scholar Award.

Krystal J. Howard – Department of English: Krystal will receive a full-year fellowship for her dissertation, “The Collage Effect and Participatory Reading in Contemporary Children’s and Young Adult Literature.” She writes that her research is “important to the field of children’s literature because it contributes to the conversation about the interplay between word and image in a variety of forms in children’s literature.” Krystal is the recipient of numerous honors and awards for her research. Among the most recent is the 2016 Graduate Student Essay Award-Ph.D. Level from the Children’s Literature Association. She also received the Norma Van Rheenen Award for Graduate Teaching Effectiveness in English Composition, as well as the Department of English Graduate Teaching Effectiveness Award. She is also the recipient of Western Michigan University’s prestigious All-University Graduate Teaching Effectiveness Award. In addition, she has received Graduate College Graduate Student Travel Grants to present her research at academic conferences. Krystal has presented her research at six professional conferences and also published two book chapters on the history of the American comic book and on the Gothic graphic novel for young readers. She is also a creative writer, with publications in literary journals, and has served as managing editor and poetry editor for Third Coast, the Department’s award-winning journal. Dr. Gwen Tarbox, Krystal’s dissertation advisor, considers her “one of our department’s finest teachers of literature.”

Randall A. Janes– Department of History: Randall will receive a full-year fellowship to complete his dissertation titled “Between the Ingenio and the Ingeniero: The Spanish Sugar Master and the Development of the Ibero-American Sugar Industry.” Randall has been the recipient of many awards, including the Judith F. Stone Award from the Department of History, as well as the Dr. Nora Faires Research and Travel Award from the History Graduate Student Organization. In addition, he has received a Graduate Student Research Grant from Western Michigan University’s Graduate College. He was awarded a prestigious fellowship from the Smithsonian Institute to work as a resident scholar in the Museum of American History, and also was awarded a Dibner Fellowship in the History of Science and Technology from the Huntington Library in San Marino, California to examine treatises and other documents related to his dissertation research. Dr. Lewis Pyenson, Randall’s dissertation chair, describes Randall’s “mastery of secondary sources in a wide range of languages,” as well as his ability to write in a compelling manner that illuminates the narrative process. Dr. Pyenson considers Randall, “one of the finest thinkers and writers among graduate students in History here.”

Dissertation Completion Fellowship printable pdf

2016 Patricia L. Thompson Dissertation Award Announced

The Graduate College is pleased to announce that two WMU doctoral students have been named recipient of Patricia L. Thompson Dissertation Award for the 2016–17 academic year. The Patricia L. Thompson Dissertation Award are funded generously from Dr. Donald Thompson, former WMU vice president for research and dean of the Graduate College. Awards are given to assist recipients in all fields of study with expenses associated with the dissertation.

The 2016–17 Patricia L. Thompson Dissertation Award recipients:

Megan M. Arnott – Department of English: Megan will receive the Patricial L. Thompson Dissertation Award for her dissertation titled, “Hardruler: Characterizations of Haraldr harðráði,” Megan’s research into medieval historiography and characterization reflects current work in her discipline. Through her research, she examines the ways in which King Harold Sigurdsson, king of Norway from 1046-1066, has been characterized in medieval and post-medieval sources. In addition, she examines the authors’ political motivations or biases realized through their respective characterizations and provides insight into the ways in which scholars and communities construct their heroes. Dr. Jana Shulman, Megan’s dissertation advisor, writes that Megan has “an impressive publishing record.” She has also presented her research in national and international conference settings, eight in all. Moreover, Megan holds degrees in Public History, Norse, and Viking Studies, and is well versed in Old-Norse-Icelandic, Old English, Latin, and French. Dr. Shulman considers Megan to be “an ambassador for things medieval,” one who takes this work “very seriously.” According to Dr. Shulman, there have been no full length studies of King Harold, and Megan’s research “will have significant impact on the disciplines of medieval Scandinavian literature and history.”

Shawn R. Brueshaber – Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering: Shawn will receive the Patricia L. Thompson Dissertation Award for his dissertation titled “Accumulation of Polar Vorticity in a Forced-Turbulance 3D Primitive Equations Model.” Shawn is a mechanical and aerospace engineer with 21 years of experience who is currently completing his doctoral studies. He has a distinguished teaching record at Western Michigan University and has designed and developed a course in Theoretical and Computational Fluid Dynamics, as well as a course in Thermodynamics. Shawn has been actively involved in research, having presented at the American Astronomical Society’s 46th Annual Division of Planetary Sciences conference, a major venue for his discipline. Of his research, Shawn writes that “the more we choose to understand about the atmospheric motion of the worlds of our solar system, the more we will learn about fundamental basics of weather and climate on other planets, and on our own,” and moreover, “we may help to breach the last bastion of classical physics: fluid turbulence.” Dr. William Liou, Shawn’s dissertation advisor, describes Shawn as an “insatiable learner” whose research is the “first to model the polar atmoshperic environment of the giant planets (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune) using a 3-D primitive equations model with forced-turbulance.”

2016 Thompson Award printable pdf

2016 Gwen Frostic Doctoral Fellowships Announced

The Graduate College is pleased to announce that four WMU doctoral students have been named recipients of Gwen Frostic Doctoral Fellowships for the 2016–17 academic year. The Gwen Frostic Doctoral Fellowships are funded generously from an endowment made possible by the late poet, artist, and naturalist, Gwen Frostic, a WMU alumna, Class of 1929. Awards are given to assist recipients with the completion of the doctoral dissertation in all disciplines.

The 2016–17 Gwen Frostic Doctoral Fellowships recipients are as follows:

Carol L. Beaver – Department of Biological Sciences: Carol Beaver will receive the Gwen Frostic Doctoral Fellowship for her dissertation, “Microbial Communities Associated with High Magnetic Suspectibility in Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soils.” According to Dr. Silvia Rossbach, Carol’s dissertation advisor, “Carol’s work is at the forefront of a new interdisciplinary research area: biogeophysics.” Only recently, writes Rossbach, are geologists beginning to understand that microorganisms influence geology and that these geological parameters change in response to microbial activity. Carol has presented her research at various state, regional, and international conferences and has received numerous awards for her writing and presentations at these events. She was recently published in the peer-reviewed journal Geomicrobiology. According to Dr. Rossbach, “Carol’s research will have great impact on not only one, but two disciplines, microbiology and geophysics.” Carol writes that her future interests include “discovering the relationships between microbial populations and the metabolic processes they use for the bioremediation of petroleum, and exploring geophysical methods that monitor bioremediation by these organisms. After graduation with her Ph.D., Carol plans to continue to develop tools that ameliorate polluted environments.

Sarah M. VanderMeer – Department of Geosciences: Sarah VanderMeer will receive the Gwen Frostic Doctoral Fellowship for her dissertation research titled, “Mapping and Interpreting Quaternary Landforms of Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore, Michigan.” Sarah has presented her research at three different regional and national geology conferences and was the first place winner for the Best Graduate Student Poster Contest at one of the regional conferences. She is also the recipient of many awards and professional recognitions. In 2014, Sarah won the W. David Kuenzi Memorial Award, as well as the Douglas Daniels Endowed Geoscience Scholarship and Award. Sarah also is the recipient of Western Michigan University’s All-University Graduate Teaching Effectiveness award in 2016. Dr. Alan Kehew, Sarah’s dissertation advisor, writes that “Pictured Rocks was the only park in the entire national system that did not have a surficial geologic map,” and he envisioned the creation of a geologic map as a project that Sarah should consider as one focal point of her dissertation research. Dr. Kehew writes that this project “will have great significance in that it will be viewed by hundreds of thousands of visitors per year at the visitors’ centers and will be used for geologic interpretation by the National Park Service.” In his view, Sarah is “building an outstanding record of academic accomplishments at WMU.”

Jagjit Kaur – Department of Physics: Jagjit Kaur will receive the Gwen Frostic Doctoral Fellowship for her dissertation research titled, “Low-Temperature Dielectronic Recombination Calculations For Si-like Ions.” Jagjit is an advisee of Dr. Thomas Gorczyca and is part of his atomic physics research group at Western Michigan University. She is also collaborating with Dr. Nigel Badnell, renowned atomic physicist from the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, who has developed a set of computational programs that Jagjit is currently using in her research. Jagjit has presented her research at both national and international conferences, and she has published her work in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. She is also the recipient of the prestigious Leo R. Parpart Scholarship for outstanding research. In addition to research, Jagjit also has an impressive teaching record and has taught the undergraduate physics laboratory for over three years. Moreover, she has mentored students in the advanced physics laboratory, covering experiments in solid-state physics, nuclear physics, and atomic physics, an opportunity given only to students whose work the Department of Physics recognizes as exceptional. Dr. Gorczyca writes that Jagjit “has a bright future ahead of her in the interdisciplinary research area of laboratory astrophysics.”

Rong Shi – Department of Economics: Rong Shi will receive the Gwen Frostic Doctoral Fellowship for her dissertation research titled “Three Essays on Educational and Nutritional Problems in China.” This study focuses upon the topic of nutrition and educational needs in rural China and will have important implications in the development of health and wellbeing initiatives for children in developing countries. Dr. Christine Moser, Rong’s dissertation advisor, writes that this topic is an “important and growing area in economics” that has critical public policy implications. Rong writes that given China’s rapid economic growth and economic reform measures, there has also been the creation of a “large gap between urban and rural China, in both health and educational outcomes.” She recognizes this gap as a factor that lends to social instability and that also contributes to future income and social inequalities. Her research will examine the impact of supplemental nutrition programs, as well as parent training programs and will lend insightful information into the creation of effective interventions to enhance rural children’s nutritional and educational sustainability. Rong has presented her research at professional conferences and is currently developing manuscripts for publication in peer-reviewed journals

2016 Frostic Fellowship printable pdf 

 

Students Honored at tenth annual Research and Creative Activities Poster and Performance Day

The tenth annual Research and Creative Activities Poster and Performance Day was held April 14, 2016. Around 150 students, faculty, and staff attended this celebration of the research and creative works done by WMU graduate students. 40 poster presentations and one musical performance represented 20 departments from across the university. The 31 faculty judges had the difficult task of scoring the presentations.
The following students won awards:

  • Abduljaleel Al-Hasnawi - Computer Science a photo of the winners of the tenth annual Research and Creative Activites Poster and Performance Day presentations. The students and faculty members are holding their award certificates in front of them. Standing with the students is Graduate Dean Dr. Susan Stapleton.
  • Wisam Al-Isawi - Chemistry
  • Ahmed Almulihi - Computer Science
  • Amean Shareaf Ghazi Al-Safi - Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Taylor Birkholz - Biological Sciences
  • Joanna Dickens - Biological Sciences
  • Abotalib Farag - Geosciences
  • Janice Marie Fulford - Science Education
  • Joshua Teo Lee Kuok - Mechanical Engineering
  • Daniel Abraham Mengistu - Economics
  • Zachariah Oaster - Sociology
  • Pimam Manzi Pidalatan - Economics
  • Simon Purdy - Sociology
  • Matthew Rine - Geosciences
  • Ran Shi - Educational Leadership, Research, and Technology
  • Viraj Thanthirige - Chemistry
  • Patrick Vail - Economics
  • Mark Webster - Biological Sciences
  • Tai-Hsien Wu - Chemical and Paper Engineering

Graduate Research and Creative Scholar Awards announcedthis photo shows two international students at an awards ceremony. Both women are holding up certificates of recognition for their out standing work as students at W M U .

The Graduate College, the Graduate Studies Council, and the Graduate Student Association are proud to announce the 2015–16 recipients of the Graduate Research and Creative Scholar Awards at Western Michigan University

The All-University Scholars for 2015–16

  • Zhenming Bi - Mathematics
  • Sajan Kumar Chatarla - Chemical and Paper Engineering
  • Sepehr Emamian - Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Abotalib Z.A. Farag – Geosciences
  • Melinda M. McCormick - Sociology
  • Iliana Rocha - English
  • Milton Rene Soto-Ferrari - Industrial and Entrepreneurial Engineering
  • Cody T. Williams – Mallinson Institute for Science Education
  • Zachary J. Zimmermann - Psychology
  • Adam E. Zweber – Philosophy

The Department Scholars for 2015–16

  • Erika K. Loveland – Anthropology
  • Wan Wei - Applied Economics
  • Carol L. Beaver - Biological Sciences
  • John D. Christie - Biological Sciences
  • Sajan Kumar Chatarla - Chemical Engineering
  • Shaun P. Shields - Chemical Engineering
  • Basil Mohammed Ahmed Ahmed - Chemistry
  • Timothy A. Glidewell - Chemistry
  • Jasmine M. Labine - Communication
  • Zachary T. Smith - Comparative Religion
  • Ayaz Akram - Computer Engineering
  • Shilpa Lakhanpal - Computer Science
  • Praveen Bhat - Computer Science
  • Adam R. Osborne - Counselor Education
  • Leah N. Sylver - Counselor Education
  • Carol M. Adams-Shearer - Counselor Education
  • Margaret A. Sweeney - Counselor Education
  • Shealyn J. Blanchard - Counseling Psychology
  • Matthew R. Smith - Counseling Psychology
  • Sepehr Emamian - Electrical & Computer Engineering
  • Deborah Germaine Augustin - English
  • Iliana Rocha – English
  • Brandy L. Walkington - Family & Consumer Sciences
  • Claudio Owusu - Geography
  • Abotalib Zaki Abotalib Farag - Geosciences
  • Jeffrey M. Hudson - Geosciences
  • Milton Rene Soto Ferrari - Industrial Engineering
  • Muaaz Gul Awan - Interdisciplinary Engineering & Applied Sciences
  • Tai-Hsien Wu - Interdisciplinary Engineering & Applied Sciences
  • Adriane K. MacPhedran - Interdisciplinary Health Sciences
  • Lyssa N. Wilson – Interdisciplinary PhD in Evaluation
  • Andrew P. Bentley - Mallinson Institute for Science Education
  • Cody T. Williams - Mallinson Institute for Science Education
  • Zhenming Bi - Mathematics
  • Elizabeth H. Fraser - Mathematics Education
  • Mohammad Hady Makhmalbaf - Mechanical Engineering
  • Steven L. Beuerle - Mechanical Engineering
  • Eric A. Hester - Music (Accelerated)
  • Jason R. Keeler - Music Therapy
  • David C. Ryder – Nursing
  • Michael J. Joyce - Paper & Printing Science
  • Adam E. Zweber - Philosophy
  • Joshua R. Berkenpas - Political Science
  • Sevda Arslan - Political Science
  • Zachary J. Zimmermann - Psychology
  • Melinda M. McCormick - Sociology
  • Zachariah G. Oaster – Sociology
  • Alba Fernandez Fernandez - Spanish
  • Viridiana Garcia Hernandez – Spanish
  • Karrie M. Nasers – Teaching, Learning & Educational Studies
  • Natalia T. Carvalho-Pinto - Teaching, Learning & Educational Studies
  • Amber J. Ritsema – Teaching, Learning & Educational Studies

Printable .pdf announcement

Graduate Teaching Effectiveness Awards Announced

The Graduate College, the Graduate Studies Council, and the Graduate Student Association are proud to announce the 2015–16 recipients of the Graduate Teaching Effectiveness Awards at Western Michigan University

The All-University Graduate Teachers for 2015-16
  • Sommer E. Cain – Spanish
  • Caroline E. Haley - English
  • Anthony M. Healy - Music
  • Elizabeth L. MacQuillan - Interdisciplinary Health Sciences
  • Peggy M. McNeal – Mallinson Institute for Science Education
  • Eric W. Mishne - Communication
  • Colleen E. O'Brien – English
  • Jessica M. Rocheleau - Psychology
  • Sarah M. VanderMeer - Geosciences
The Department Graduate Teachers for 2015-16
  • Anna P. Alioto – Anthropology
  • Alexandra Yuryevna Polovinka - Applied Economics
  • Matthew T. Deighton - Biological Sciences
  • Natasha R. Schiller - Biological Sciences
  • Shaun P. Shields - Chemical Engineering
  • David L. Sellers - Chemistry
  • Sabrina N. Russell - Chemistry
  • Lizmert Amarys Lopez Gonzalez - Civil Engineering
  • Eric W. Mishne - Communication
  • Caleb M. Ausbury - Comparative Religion
  • Omofolakunmi Elizabeth Olagbemi - Computer Science
  • Hisham M. Saleh - Computer Science
  • Valerie-Ann S. Becker - Counselor Education
  • Stephanie R. Goodman - Counselor Education
  • Amie C. Murphy - Counselor Education
  • Brandi M. Zoll - Counselor Education
  • Deidre P. Begay - Counseling Psychology
  • Brianna M. Scott - Counseling Psychology
  • Soong Min Chow - Educational Leadership
  • Fareed Y. Shalhout - Educational Leadership
  • Brian C. Durant - Electrical Engineering
  • Zeinab Ramshani - Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Caroline E. Heath - English
  • Colleen E. O'Brien - English
  • Steffany L. Maher - English
  • Caroline E. Haley - English
  • Ashley L. Machacek - Family and Consumer Sciences
  • Zachary A. Merrill - Geography
  • Sarah M. VanderMeer - Geosciences
  • Thomas C. Brubaker - Geosciences
  • Spencer T. Hunt - History
  • Tai-Hsien Wu-Interdisciplinary Engineering and Applied Sciences
  • Elizabeth L. MacQuillan - Interdisciplinary Health Sciences
  • Peggy M. McNeal – Mallinson Institute for Science Education
  • Angela M. Willson - Mallinson Institute for Science Education
  • Alexis D. Byers - Mathematics
  • Ali Merat – Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
  • Kenneth M. Mull - Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
  • Anthony M. Healy – Music
  • Ahmed Fernando Anzaldua El Samkary - Music
  • Bilge Nazli Altay - Paper and Printing Science
  • Zachary G. Milstead - Philosophy
  • Rasanjali Jayathissa - Physics
  • Sarah V. Perez - Political Science
  • Sela A. Sanberg - Psychology
  • Jessica M. Rocheleau - Psychology
  • Rebecca L. Sevin - Sociology
  • Katherine E. Brown - Sociology
  • Sommer E. Cain - Spanish

Printable pdf. announcement 

 

a photo of three women at an awards ceremony. The two women on each side hold certificates of recognition and are wearing dark jackets. The woman in the middle is wearing a bright red scarf