Global Events

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March 2017

Thursday, March 30

Friday, March 31

  • Department of World Languages and Literatures award ceremony—3 p.m. in 208-209 Bernhard Center at Western Michigan University, hosted by the Department of World Languages and Literatures. Join as students and faculty are recognized for their role in the Department of World Languages and Literatures. Free and open to the public.

April 2017

Saturday, April 1

  • "Worshiping at Lenin's Mausoleum" book reading—1 to 2:30 p.m. at Kazoo Books, 2413 Parkview Ave, Kalamazoo. Join Dr. Judith Rypma, master faculty specialist of English, as she reads from her latest collection "Worshipping at Lenin's Mausoleum." Free and open to the public.
  • "Celebrating the Legacy of César E. Chávez" fundraising and awards dinner—5 p.m. at the Fetzer Center, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Southwest Michigan César E. Chávez Committee. The event will celebrate the life and work of civil rights leader César E. Chávez during an annual scholarship fundraising dinner that includes the presentation of regional awards and scholarships for 2017. Tickets are $25 for students and $40 for general admission; open to the public.
  • WMU Study Abroad poetry exhibit—April 1 to April 21 in the first floor of the Waldo Library, hosted by the University Libraries. Enjoy poetry exhibits from WMU Study Abroad alumni that showcase their experiences abroad. Free and open to the public. 

Sunday, April 2

  • International Festival—4 to 8 p.m. in the Bernhard Center second-floor facilities at Western Michigan University. The music, dance, food and fashions of over 18 cultures will be showcased during Western Michigan University's 28th annual International Festival. Admission is free; nominal fee for traditional foods prepared by international students. Open to the public.

Monday, April 3

  • "Shifts in the Sand: U.S.-Saudi Relations" Great Decisions Global Discussion Series—6 to 7:15 p.m. at the Aquinas Performing Arts Center, 1703 Robinson Rd SE, Grand Rapids, hosted by the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan. The discussion will feature Simon Henderson, director of the Gulf and Energy Policy Program at the Washington Institute for Near East Politics. Tickets are free with a WMU ID, $10 general admission. Open to the public.
  • "The Marriage of Figaro" opera—7:30 p.m. in the Dalton Recital Hall, hosted by the School of Music. The "Marriage of Figaro" is an opera buffa (comedy) in four acts composed in 1786 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Free and open to the public.

Tuesday, April 4

  • "The Marriage of Figaro" opera—7:30 p.m. in the Dalton Recital Hall, hosted by the School of Music. The "Marriage of Figaro" is an opera buffa (comedy) in four acts composed in 1786 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Free and open to the public.

Wednesday, April 5

Thursday, April 6

  • "Urbanization and Social Change in Early 20th-Century Xikang (in Tibet), China" talk—noon in 204 Bernhard Center, hosted by the Haenicke Institute for Global Education. The talk will be given by Yang Liu, assistant research fellow and PhD candidate at the Institute of Urban Studies at Sichuan University, China. Free and open to the public.
  • Board games with CELCIS students—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor CELCIS Lobby of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join CELCIS students as they learn to play U.S. American card and board games, chat with friends, hang out and meet new people! Free and open to the public.
  • "Again Toward Perpetual Peace: World Government by Lottocracy" lecture—6 p.m. in 213 Bernhard Center, hosted by the Center for Ethics in Society. The lecture will be given by Dr. Alexander Guerrero, professor of philosophy at the University of Pennsylvania. Free and open to the public.

Friday, April 7

  • Japanese language lessons for teens—4 to 4:45 p.m. in 2045 Brown Hall, hosted by the Soga Japan Center. A series of three beginner Japanese language sessions are available to middle and high school students. Registration is $30; open to the public.

Saturday, April 8

  • Walk for Water Kalamazoo 5k—1 p.m. by the fountains by Miller Auditorium, sponsored by the WMU Nonprofit Leadership Student Association, Kappa Phi Christian Women's Club and St. Thomas More Catholic Student Parish. The walk aims to increase awareness of the worldwide lack of access to clean water and to raise funds to help Clean Water for the World in its efforts to provide water purification units to communities in developing countries without potable water. Registration starts at $10; open to the public.

Sunday, April 9

  • Los Lobos at the Kalamazoo State Theatre—7:30 p.m. at the Kalamazoo State Theatre, 404 South Burdick Street, Kalamazoo. Los Lobos are a multiple Grammy Award-winning rock band from East Los Angeles whose music is influenced by rock and roll, Tex-Mex, country, R&B, blues, and traditional music from Latin America. Tickets start at $55; open to the public.

Monday, April 10

  • Japanese poetry game—2:45 p.m. in the lower level of the Waldo Library, hosted by the Soga Japan Center and the University Libraries. Learn a poetry game from Japan; Japanese language skills are not required. Free and open to the public.
  • "Social Turmoil in Hong Kong: Challenging Chinese Sovereignty?" lecture—4 p.m. in 1740 Sangren Hall, hosted by the Timothy Light Lecture Series on China. The lecture will be given by Dr. Helen Siu, professor of anthropology at Yale University. Free and open to the public.

Wednesday, April 12

  • "Respecting Differences: Gender Inclusion" talk—9:30 a.m. in the Miller Auditorium, hosted by Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo College, Discover Kalamazoo, the City of Portage and the Kalamazoo Community Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services. The talk will be given by Scott Schofield, diversity educator on transgender issues. Free and open to the public.
  • "Voices of First Generation Latino Immigrant Fathers: Migration and the Dual Frame of Reference" lecture—noon to 1 p.m. in the Lee Honors College Lounge, hosted by the Lee Honor's College Spring 2017 Lyceum Lecture Series. The lecture will be given by Dr. Angel Gullon-Rivera, assistant professor of family consumer sciences. Free and open to the public.
  • "Respecting Differences: Gender Inclusion" talk—1:30 p.m. in the Miller Auditorium, hosted by Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo College, Discover Kalamazoo, the City of Portage and the Kalamazoo Community Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services. The talk will be given by Scott Schofield, diversity educator on transgender issues. Free and open to the public.

Thursday, April 13

  • "Cultural Competence for Health Professionals" talk—12:30 to 1 p.m. at the WMU Beltline campus, 2333 E Beltline Ave SE, Grand Rapids, hosted by the WMU-Grand Rapids Open House. The talk will be given by Dr. Dee Sherwood, faculty specialist in the School of Social Work. Free and open to the public.
  • "Hungary and the New Financial Nationalism in Europe" lecture—3:30 to 5 p.m. in the Friedmann Hall third-floor library, hosted by the Department of Political Science George Klein Lecture Series. The lecture will be given by Dr. Juliet Johnson, professor of political science at McGill University. Free and open to the public.
  • "Refugee Health: Concerns, Considerations and Photos from Congolese Refugee Women" talk—4 to 4:30 p.m. at the WMU Beltline campus, 2333 E Beltline Ave SE, Grand Rapids, hosted by the WMU-Grand Rapids Open House. The talk will be given by Dr. Shannon McMorrow, assistant professor in the School of Interdisciplinary Health Programs. Free and open to the public.
  • Retirement reception—4 to 7 p.m. at the Oaklands, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. The reception will honor Joel Boyd for his 21.5 years of service to the University. Free and open to the public. 
  • "Monumental Politics in the Post-Communist World" lecture—7 to 9 p.m. in the Fetzer Center's Putney Auditorium, hosted by the Department of Political Science George Klein Lecture Series. The lecture will be given by Dr. Juliet Johnson, professor of political science at McGill University. Free and open to the public.

Friday, April 14

  • Japanese language lessons for teens—4 to 4:45 p.m. in 2045 Brown Hall, hosted by the Soga Japan Center. A series of three beginner Japanese language sessions are available to middle and high school students. Registration is $30; open to the public.
  • International Ball—7 to 11 p.m. in the Student Center of the Bernhard Center, hosted by International Student Activities and the Western Student Association. The International Ball is a fun formal event where domestic and international students can end the semester with dinner, dancing and the comedian Danish Maqbool. Tickets start at $5; purchase tickets in 3516, 3521, or 3530 Ellsworth Hall or by emailing intl-specialprojects@wmich.edu.

Monday, April 17

Wednesday, April 19

  • Local Global Market—10 to 2 p.m. in front of Sangren Hall, hosted by International Student Activities. Area farmers will bring fresh fruits and produce to campus for purchase. Email wayne.l.bond@wmich.edu for questions. Free and open to the public.
  • "The Great Economic Potential of Immigration to the U.S." lecture—noon to 1:15 p.m. in 2028 Brown Hall, hosted by the Department of Economics Werner Sichel Lecture Series. The lecture will be given by Dr. Giovanni Peri, professor and chair of economics at the University of California, Davis. Free and open to the public.

Thursday, April 20

  • "Transference: Poetry in Translation" poetry readings—4 p.m. on the third floor of Waldo Library, hosted by the Department of World Languages and Literatures and the University Libraries. Faculty and students present readings of poetry in translation. Free and open to the public.

Friday, April 21

  • Japanese language lessons for teens—4 to 4:45 p.m. in 2045 Brown Hall, hosted by the Soga Japan Center. A series of three beginner Japanese language sessions are available to middle and high school students. Registration is $30; open to the public.

Events archive