Global Events

Get Globally Engaged this Week!—a weekly email of opportunities to get globally engaged.

October 2017

Monday, Oct. 16

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Andean Uplift and the Evolution of South American Climate and Hydrology" seminar—4 p.m. in 1118 Rood Hall, hosted by the Department of Geosciences. The seminar will feature Dr. Chris Poulsen, chair and professor of the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of Michigan. Free and open to the public. 
  • Afro-modern dance class—5:15 to 6:15 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead and Dancemakers Initiative. Join the class to learn about the basic Katherine Dunham technique which combines African and Caribbean styles of movement. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public.

Tuesday, Oct. 17

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Mesa Española—4 to 5 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public. 

  • Ethics Book Club: "The Left Hand of Darkness"—6 p.m. at the Central City Tap House, 359 S. Kalamazoo Mall, hosted by the Center for the Study of Ethics and Society. Join a discussion of "The Left Hand of Darkness" by Ursula LeGuin led by John Minser, curriculum coordinator at the WMU Homer Stryker M.D. School of Medicine. Registration required; free and open to the public.
  • "The Middle East: Regional Shifts and Global Responses" lecture—7 to 8:30 p.m. at the WMU Beltline Campus, 2333 E. Beltline Ave. S.E., Grand Rapids, hosted by the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan. The lecture will be given by Reza Marashi, research director for the National Iranian American Council. Entrance is $15; open to the public. 

Wednesday, Oct. 18

  • Local Global Market—10 to 2 p.m. in front of Sangren Hall, hosted by International Student Activities. Area farmers will bring fresh fruits and produce to campus for purchase. Email wayne.l.bond@wmich.edu for questions. Free and open to the public.
  • Lyceum Lecture Series: "Beyond Binaries: Identity and Sexuality"—noon to 1 p.m. in the Lee Honors College Lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College. The lecture will be led by Robyn Ochs, educator, speaker, grassroots activist and editor of Bi Women Quarterly. Free and open to the public.
  • "Journey to the West: the True Story of Xuanzang (602-664)" talk—noon in 205 Bernhard Center, hosted by the Timothy Light Center for Chinese Studies, the Department of History, the Confucius Institute at WMU and the Haenicke Institute for Global Education. The talk will be given by Dr. Victor Cunrui Xiong, professor of history and a recipient of the WMU Distinguished Faculty Scholar Award. Free and open to the public. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Mesa Española—3 to 4 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public.
  • Queer People of Color Discussion—5:30 to 7 p.m. in 1321 Trimpe Building, hosted by LGBT Student Services. This is a bi-monthly social group created for people of color by other queer people of color. Light refreshments provided; free and open to the public. 
  • Community African dance class—7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. This community class which focuses on African dance encourages the entire family to attend. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public. 

Thursday, Oct. 19

  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to women in the public. 
  • Speaker: Immaculée Ilibagiza—7 p.m. at the Miller Auditorium. Immaculée Ilibagiza will talk about her experience as a a survivor of the 1994 Rwandan genocide that took the lives of nearly one million Tutsis. Tickets start at $10; open to the public. 

Friday, Oct. 20

  • "Anti-Racist classroom Pedagogies: A Response to Charlottesville" workshop—noon to 1:30 p.m. in UCC 2033, hosted by the Office of Faculty Development. This installment of the Teaching Inclusivity Series will be presented by Dr. Gwen Tarbox, associate professor of English. Registration required; open to faculty, graduate students, administrators and administrative staff. 
  • Japanese Conversation Table—4 to 5 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Cafeteria, hosted by the Soga Japan Center. The conversation table is a free opportunity to practice Japanese language skills. Registration required; free and open to the public. 

Monday, Oct. 23

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Afro-modern dance class—5:15 to 6:15 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead and Dancemakers Initiative. Join the class to learn about the basic Katherine Dunham technique which combines African and Caribbean styles of movement. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public.

Tuesday, Oct. 24

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Mesa Española—4 to 5 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public. 

  • Ethics Book Club: "The Left Hand of Darkness"—6 p.m. at the Central City Tap House, 359 S. Kalamazoo Mall, hosted by the Center for the Study of Ethics and Society. Join a discussion of "The Left Hand of Darkness" by Ursula LeGuin led by John Minser, curriculum coordinator at the WMU Homer Stryker M.D. School of Medicine. Registration required; free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, Oct. 25

  • Local Global Market—10 to 2 p.m. in front of Sangren Hall, hosted by International Student Activities. Area farmers will bring fresh fruits and produce to campus for purchase. Email wayne.l.bond@wmich.edu for questions. Free and open to the public.
  • Lyceum Lecture Series: "Intersectional Coalition Building"—noon to 1 p.m. in the Lee Honors College Lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College. The lecture will be led by Romeo Jackson, graduate student at the University of Utah. Free and open to the public.
  • Werner Sichel Lecture Series: "Income Inequality, Progressive Taxation and Tax Expenditures"—noon to 1:15 p.m. in 2028 Brown Hall, hosted by the Department of Economics. The lecture will be presented by James Hines Jr., professor of economics and law at the University of Michigan. Free and open to the public. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Mesa Española—3 to 4 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public.
  • Community African dance class—7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. This community class which focuses on African dance encourages the entire family to attend. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public. 

Thursday, Oct. 26

  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to women in the public. 
  • "The Road to Art is to promote the spiritual civilization of mankind" public lecture4 p.m. in 4705 Sangren, hosted by the Confucius Institute at WMU. The lecture will be given by Zhaowei Jiang, figure painting artist and art educator with outstanding achievements in China in the 20th century. Free and open to the public. 
  • Real Talk Diversity Series: "Disability at the Intersections"6 to 8 p.m. in the Multicultural Center in the Adrian Trimpe Building, hosted by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion. Facilitators from Disability Services for Students will explire the social model of disability, the language used around disability and how to identify and challenge one's own implicit biases. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public. 
  • "Silver Spoon" Japanese film screening—7 p.m. in 3508 Knauss Hall, hosted by the Soga Japan Center and the Japan Foundation. This film depicts the life of a city-bred boy who finds himself at a rural high school in Obihiro, Hokkaido, Japan. Free and open the public. 

Friday, Oct. 27

  • International Ladies Sports Club—2 to 3 p.m. at the Student Recreation Center, hosted by International Student Activities. Bond with women from all over the world through sports and exercise. Free and open to all women in the community. 
  • Japanese Conversation Table—4 to 5 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Cafeteria, hosted by the Soga Japan Center. The conversation table is a free opportunity to practice Japanese language skills. Registration required; free and open to the public. 

Saturday, Oct. 28

  • "There is No Lid on the Sea" Japanese film screening—2 p.m. in 3508 Knauss Hall, hosted by the Soga Japan Center and the Japan Foundation. This drama was adapted from a Japanese novel and depicts a woman exhausted by city life who opens a shop selling snow cones in the small town that she grew up in. Free and open to the public. 

Monday, Oct. 30

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Know Before You Go" student panel and information session—4 to 5:30 p.m. in the Trimpe Multicultural Center, hosted by Study Abroad and Financial Aid. WMU students will share study abroad experiences and the steps to financially plan to study abroad. Free and open to the public. 
  • Afro-modern dance class—5:15 to 6:15 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead and Dancemakers Initiative. Join the class to learn about the basic Katherine Dunham technique which combines African and Caribbean styles of movement. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public.

Tuesday, Oct. 31

  • Mesa Española—4 to 5 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public. 

November 2017

Wednesday, Nov. 1

  • Native American Month display—daily Nov. 1 to Dec. 1. on the third floor of the Waldo Library, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs. Stop by the Waldo Library to browse a bookcase filled with artifacts, books and articles created by Native American authors. Free and open to the public. 
  • Día de los Muertos altar display—9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the second floor of the Waldo Library, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Department of Spanish. Come to observe a traditional altar constructed in observance of the Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead). Free and open to the public. 
  • Lyceum Lecture Series: "Little Word, Big Impact: Negotiating Gender-Neutral Pronouns in Education"—noon to 1 p.m. in the Lee Honors College Lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College and the College of Education and Human Development. The lecture will be led by Dr. Lee Airton, assistant professor of gender and sexuality in education at Queen's University. Free and open to the public.
  • Mesa Española—3 to 4 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public.
  • Ethics Book Club: "The Harm in Hate Speech"—6 p.m. in 2072 Moore Hall, hosted by the Center for the Study of Ethics and Society. Join a discussion of "The Harm in Hate Speech" by Jeremy Waldron led by Kathy Purnell, a part-time instructor in the School of Public Affairs and Administration.  Registration required; free and open to the public. 
  • Community African dance class—7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. This community class which focuses on African dance encourages the entire family to attend. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public. 

Thursday, Nov. 2

  • Día de los Muertos altar display—9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the second floor of the Waldo Library, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Department of Spanish. Come to observe a traditional altar constructed in observance of the Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead). Free and open to the public. 
  • "Race, Politics and NAFTA" presentation—noon, hosted by the Lewis Walker Institue for the Study of Race and Ethnic Relations. The presentation will be given by James Russel, Hatfield School of Govermnent at Portland State University. Free and open to the public. 
  • Real Talk Diversity Series: "Racial Socialization and the Power of Narrative"—6 to 8 p.m. in the Multicultural Center in the Adrian Trimpe Building, hosted by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion. Join the WMU Student Assembly for Racial Equity and Cultural Inclusion in a critical conversation about the path to building a campus community that dismantles institutionalized racism and White supremacy in all its forms. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public. 

Friday, Nov. 3

  • Día de los Muertos altar display—9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the second floor of the Waldo Library, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Department of Spanish. Come to observe a traditional altar constructed in observance of the Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead). Free and open to the public. 
  • International Ladies Sports Club—2 to 3 p.m. at the Student Recreation Center, hosted by International Student Activities. Bond with women from all over the world through sports and exercise. Free and open to all women in the community. 

Saturday, Nov. 4

  • Día de los Muertos altar display—9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the second floor of the Waldo Library, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Department of Spanish. Come to observe a traditional altar constructed in observance of the Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead). Free and open to the public. 
  • Russian Cultural Expo & Conference—10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in 1028 Brown Hall, hosted by the Department of English and the Kalamazoo Russian Culture Association. The expo and conference will feature a series of lectures, a performance of a play and a reaing set in 1917 Russia. Free and open to the public. 

Sunday, Nov. 5

  • Día de los Muertos altar display—9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the second floor of the Waldo Library, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Department of Spanish. Come to observe a traditional altar constructed in observance of the Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead). Free and open to the public. 

Monday, Nov. 6

  • Día de los Muertos altar display—9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the second floor of the Waldo Library, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Department of Spanish. Come to observe a traditional altar constructed in observance of the Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead). Free and open to the public. 

Tuesday, Nov. 7

  • Día de los Muertos altar display—9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the second floor of the Waldo Library, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Department of Spanish. Come to observe a traditional altar constructed in observance of the Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead). Free and open to the public. 
  • Mesa Española—4 to 5 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public. 

  • Ethics Book Club: "The Left Hand of Darkness"—6 p.m. at the Central City Tap House, 359 S. Kalamazoo Mall, hosted by the Center for the Study of Ethics and Society. Join a discussion of "The Left Hand of Darkness" by Ursula LeGuin led by John Minser, curriculum coordinator at the WMU Homer Stryker M.D. School of Medicine. Registration required; free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, Nov. 8

  • Día de los Muertos altar display—9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the second floor of the Waldo Library, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Department of Spanish. Come to observe a traditional altar constructed in observance of the Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead). Free and open to the public. 
  • Lyceum Lecture Series: "Promoting Resilience in Individuals and Couples with LGBTQ+ Identities"—noon to 1 p.m. in the Lee Honors College Lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College. The lecture will be led by Dr. Gary Bischof, professor and dean of Lee Honors College, and Amber Mosley, coordinator of sexual assault prevention education at Sindecuse Health Center. Free and open to the public.
  • Mesa Española—3 to 4 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public.

Friday, Nov. 10

  • "Strategies to confront implicit biases and avoid micro-aggression" workshop—noon to 1:30 p.m. in 2033 University Computing Center, hosted by the Office of Faculty Development. This installment of the Teaching Inclusivity Series will be presented by Dr.

    Mariam Konaté, associate professor of gender and women's studies. Registration required; open to faculty, graduate students, administrators and administrative staff. 

Tuesday, Nov. 14

  • Mesa Española—4 to 5 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public. 
  • "Russia 2018: Putin's Last Act?" lecture—7 to 8:30 p.m. at the WMU Beltline Campus, 2333 E. Beltline Ave. S.E., Grand Rapids, hosted by the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan. The lecture will be given by John Beyrle, the former U.S. ambassador to Russia. Entrance $15; open to the public. 

Wednesday, Nov. 15

  • Lyceum Lecture Series: "Transgender Stories"—noon to 1 p.m. in the Lee Honors College Lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College. The panel-style session will be led by Sara Jacobs, program director of Out Proud Safe, Jay Maddock, executive director of OutFront Kalamazoo and Natalie Nguyen, director of WMU LBGT Student Services. Free and open to the public.
  • Mesa Española—3 to 4 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public.

Thursday, Nov. 16

  • "The discovery of Puerto Rico in 1493" talk—6:30 to 7 p.m. in 1750 Sangren Hall, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs. The talk will be given by Dr. Ángel Gullón-Rivera, professor in the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences. Free and open to the public. 

Tuesday, Nov. 28

  • Mesa Española—4 to 5 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, Nov. 29

  • Lyceum Lecture Series: "Resisting Reconciliation: Queer Muslim Indentity in America"—noon to 1 p.m. in the Lee Honors College Lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College. The lecture will be led by Mariam Mustafa, comparative religion graduate student. Free and open to the public.
  • Mesa Española—3 to 4 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public.

December 2017

Tuesday, Dec. 5

  • Mesa Española—4 to 5 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public. 

  • Kwanzaa Celebration—5:30 to 7 p.m. in the Multicultural Center of the Adrian Trimpe Building, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Office for Diversity and Inclusion. The event will feature traditional Kwanzaa foods as well as a speaker who will explain the meaning of the holiday tradition. Free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, Dec. 6

  • Lyceum Lecture Series: "The Life and Death of Latisha King"—noon to 1 p.m. in the Lee Honors College Lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College, the Center for the Study of Ethics in Society, Gender and Women's Studies and Philosophy. The lecture will be led by Dr. Gayle Salamon, associate professor of English at Princeton University. Free and open to the public.
  • Mesa Española—3 to 4 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public.

Tuesday, Dec. 11

  • Mesa Española—4 to 5 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, Dec. 12

  • Mesa Española—3 to 4 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public.

Events archive