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Events

Spring 2014 Biological Sciences Seminar Series

Fridays 3:30 to 4:30 p.m.
1710 Wood Hall

Yan Lu, Faculty Coordinator
(269) 387-2084

Jan. 10
Dr. Douglas Landis, Michigan State University
Topic: Redesigning Agricultural Landscapes for Multiple Ecosystem Services

Jan. 17
Dr. Tony Schilmiller, Michigan State University
Topic: Diversity and evolution of tomato trichome specialized metabolism

Jan. 24
Dr. Ken Brown, George Washington University
Topic: Novel roles for neurotransmitters in early embryogenesis

Jan. 31
Dr. Markus Friedrich, Wayne State University
Topic: Ptomaphagus hirtus: the blind cave beetle that wasn't

Feb. 7
Dr. Jeffrey Mason, Utah State University
Topic: What do Flies, Worms and Women have in common?

Feb. 14
Dr. John Jellies, Western Michigan University
Topic: A Tale of (Almost) A Thousand Eyes: An Emerging Story of Ultraviolet Detection and Visual Responses in Medicinal Leeches

Feb. 21
Dr. David Jeng, Western Michigan University
Topic: Unusual demanor of two viral proteins in the survival strategy of tanapoxvirus

Feb. 25 - (12:30 p.m.) Room 1220 Chemistry Building
Dr. Pamela Raymond, University of Michigan
Topic: TBA

Mar. 14
Dr. Dr. Aaron Putzke, Hope College
Worm, Zebrafish and Stem Cells...Oh my! Uncovering Roles for Fer kinase during development

Mar. 21
Dr. Michal Zion, Bar-Ilan University, Israel
Topic: Dynamic Inquiry meets individual and social metacognition

Mar. 28
Dr. Neal Goodwin, Champions Oncology, Inc.
Topic: Tumorgraft Avatar Platform for Clinical Advancement

Apr. 4
Dr. Daniel Wagenaar, University of Cincinnati
Topic: Crossmodal sensory integration in an invertebrate predator: How a hungry leech finds its prey

Apr. 11 (Room 1220 Chemistry Building)
Dr. Inger Damon, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Topic: Monkeypox, and new and novel poxviruses

Apr. 18
Dr. Angela Kent, University of Illinois - Urbana Champaign
Topic: TBA

Apr. 25
Dr. Jessica Miesel, Michigan State University
Topic: Forest management and climate effects on fire regimes in North American forests: a below ground perspective