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Abstracts from Volume 34, Number 4
(December, 2007)


TWO DECADES AFTER MCMARTIN: A FOLLOW-UP
OF 22 CONVICTED DAY CARE EMPLOYEES
Mary deYoung

It has been more that two decades since the notorious McMartin
Preschool case created a day care ritual abuse master-narrative
that recruited many social workers into becoming involved
in case-finding, investigations, interviewing and advocacy. The
purpose of this article is threefold: it introduces a sample of 22
day care employees who were convicted in day care ritual abuse
cases; it updates their current legal status; and it discusses the
relevance of these cases to social workers who currently are being
recruited by today’s new master narratives about extrafamilial
sexual threats to children, whether from neighborhood pedophiles,
child pornographers, parish priests or internet predators.


NEGOTIATING ‘PROFESSIONAL AGENCY’:
SOCIAL WORK AND DECISION-MAKING
WITHIN THE ONTARIO CHILD WELFARE SYSTEM
Henry Parada, Lisa Barnoff, and Brienne Coleman

This article explores how social work as a discipline has helped to
negotiate professional agency in decision-making within the restructured
child protection system. The narratives of child protection
workers affirm that a restrictive climate does exist in child
protection agencies and that it indeed shapes the way they make
their decisions. This study uses institutional ethnography as the
methodology for exploring the decision-making practices of child
protection workers. Three forms of data collection were used: experience
as data, documentation reviews and in-depth interviews.


A CRITIQUE OF THE GLOBAL TRAFFICKING
DISCOURSE AND U.S. POLICY
Moshoula Capous Desyllas

This article examines the dominant discourse on trafficking in persons
and the implementation of international and U.S. policy to
address trafficking globally. Features of the United Nations Protocol
and the Trafficking in Victims Protection Act demonstrate
how trafficking frameworks currently in place contain underlying
fears of migration and female sexuality. The implications of
policy on the construction of third world women as “victims to
be saved” through governments, National Government Organizations,
feminists and the media will show how these misrespresentations
only reinforce racism and dualistic simplifications of a complex
issue. An emphasis is placed on the importance of women’s
agency and the possibility of multiple realities. An alternative way
of thinking about human trafficking and related policy through a
labor rights, migration and human rights framework is proposed.


A QUALITATIVE STUDY OF LETTERS TO PRESIDENT
KENNEDY FROM PERSONS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS
AND THEIR FAMILIES:USING THE RESEARCH POEM
IN POLICY ORIENTED RESEARCH
Rich Furman and Allison Shukraft

Using the research poem as a tool of data representation, this paper
presents findings from an analysis of letters sent to President John F.
Kennedy regarding the formulation of mental health policy during
the early 1960s. The article presents the experiences of consumers of
mental health services and their families—shapers and receivers of
mental health provisions that are infrequently given voice. Traditional
thematic analysis was conducted, and data subsequently were represented
in three poetic forms: free verse, the pantoum, and the tanka.


THE RESEARCH PRACTICES AND NEEDS OF NONPROFIT
ORGANIZATIONS IN AN URBAN CENTER
Randy Stoecker

How do nonprofit organizations use data and research? What challenges
do they face in conducting research and managing data?
In spring of 2004, 80 nonprofit organizations in Toledo, Ohio returned
a survey on their research and data needs and practices.
The survey found that nonprofits collect data on a wide variety
of topics, but do not use much of the data that they collect, and do
not collect much data that could be useful for other groups, particularly
neighborhood organizations. The average nonprofit in the
survey has five employees and four volunteers who, together, spend
56 hours per week collecting, managing, and reporting on data.
Nearly half of the organizations have no staff or volunteers with
formal research training. The others have only one or two people
with formal research training. More than half indicated a need for
training on how to conduct evaluations, how to use data management
software, how to conduct research, and how to find funding.


PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SOURCES OF ASSISTANCE
FOR LOW-INCOME HOUSEHOLDS
Chi-Fang Wu and Mary Keegan Eamon

This study examined the types and combinations of public and private
assistance received by three types of low-income households, including
those with children, without children, and elderly without children. Using
data from the 1996 and 2001 panels of the Survey
of Income and Program Participation (SIPP), the results indicate
that a large percentage of low-income households rely on public
assistance, and receipt of private assistance is much less common.
Approximately 7% of the sample use both types of assistance. The
findings highlight differences in combinations of public and private
assistance used by different household types. We also found some signifi-
cant differences in the factors that determine receipt of public and
private assistance. Practice and policy implications are discussed.


SOCIAL FUNCTIONING: A SOCIOLOGICAL COMMON
BASE FOR SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE
Thomas J. Blakely and Gregory M. Dziadosz

This article describes the experience of a social work mental
health agency with Social Role Theory (SRT), that is an organizing
concept for the delivery of its assessment and treatment program.
SRT has been called the process variable of the program,
meaning how services are delivered. Social functioning, a concept
taken from SRT, is a treatment outcome. The overall purposes
of the article are to describe the contribution of sociology
to social work practice, and to advance the argument that social
functioning is a common base for social work practice generally.

 

BOOK REVIEWS


International Social Work Research: Issues and Prospects.
Tony Tripodi and Miriam Potoky-Tripodi.
Reviewed by Teresa Morris.

Strategic Giving: The Art and Science of Philanthropy.
Peter Frumkin.
Reviewed by Ram Cnaan.

Welfare Discipline: Discourse, Governance and Globalization.
Sanford F. Schram.
Reviewed by Pranab Chatterjee and Kathleen M. Alman.

Human Behavior for Social Work Practice: A Developmental-
Ecological Framework.

Wendy Haight and Edward H. Taylor.
Reviewed by Marvin D. Feit.

The Relationship Rights of Children.
James G. Dwyer.
Reviewed by Mary Ann Mason.

The Future of Europe: Reform or Decline.
Alberto Alesina and Francesco Gianvassi.
Reviewed by James Midgley.


BOOK NOTES


Social Theory: Central Issues in Sociology.
John Scott.

Humanitarian Aid Work: A Critical Approach.
Carlos Martin Beristain.

Unsung Heroines: Single Mothers and the American Dream.
Ruth Sidel.

Deadly Worlds: The Emotional Costs of Globalization.
Charles Lemert and Anthony Elliott.

Solving the Health Care Problem: How Other Nations
Succeeded and Why the United States Has Not.
Pamela Behan.

American Families: Past and Present.
Susan M. Ross, Editor.


INDEX OF VOLUME XXXIV, ISSUES 1-4

 

 

 

 

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