Carlos Pimentel

Photo of Carlos Pimentel
Carlos Pimentel
Advisor of Japanese and Assistant Professor of Japanese
Office: 
(269) 387-3005
Fax: 
(269) 387-6333
Location: 
517-A Sprau Tower, Mail Stop 5338
Mailing address: 
World Languages and Literatures
Western Michigan University
1903 W Michigan Ave
Kalamazoo MI 49008-5338 USA
Office hours: 

Tuesday and Wednesday, 2:30 to 3:30 p.m.
And by appointment

Students whose last names begin with A through M should see Dr. Carlos Pimentel: Next office hours will be held in the fall.
Students whose last names begin with N through Z should see Dr. Rika Saito: Next office hours will be held in the fall.

Education: 
  • Ph.D., East Asian Languages and Literatures with Specialization in Japanese Linguistics, The Ohio State University, 2014
  • M.A., Japanese Literature, University of Massachusetts, 2006
  • B.A., Japanese Language and Linguistics, University of Massachusetts, 1995
Teaching interests: 
  • Japanese linguistics
  • Japanese language pedagogy
  • Japanese second language acquisition
Research interests: 
  • Second language acquisition
  • Teaching methodologies
  • Zainichi Korean literature
Bio: 

Dr. Carlos Pimentel is an assistant professor and advisor of Japanese in the Department of World Languages and Literatures at Western Michigan University.

He is originally from New York City and began his study of Japanese language and linguistics at the University of Massachusetts. He studied as an exchange student at Kwansei Gakuin University (関西学院大学) in Japan. After graduating from UMass he worked at the Japan Travel Bureau in New York City, then as an Assistant Language Teacher and Coordinator for International Relations for the Japan Exchange and Teaching Program in Kobe, Japan. He received his Ph.D. in Japanese linguistics from The Ohio State University in 2014.

Pimentel served for three years as undergraduate program director and advisor in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Maryland. His research focus is on how native English speakers acquire the pronominal system in Japanese.