Take advantage of global engagement opportunities in November

contact: Korey Force
| WMU News

The annual Japan Festival will be part of the 2017 festivities and will include free traditional food.KALAMAZOO, Mich.—Western Michigan University and the extended Kalamazoo community will offer numerous global engagement opportunities in November. Highlights include Día de los Muertos activities, opportunities to help international students practice conversational English, and various festivals and global lectures in celebration of International Education Week 2017. 

The month of November hosts International Education Week, a joint initiative of the U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Department of Education in efforts to promote programs that prepare U.S. Americans for a global environment and attract future leaders from abroad to study, learn and exchange experiences. As a proud partner of International Education Week, WMU student groups, academic departments and units across campus come together to highlight the various countries and cultures present at the University. The WMU campus and greater community are invited to attend International Education Week events scheduled for Sunday, Nov. 12, through Friday, Nov. 17. 

 International Education Week 2017 

Opportunities to get globally engaged are published weekly at wmich.edu/global/events by WMU's Haenicke Institute for Global Education.

November 2017 opportunities

Wednesday, Nov. 1

  • Native American Month display—daily Nov. 1 to Dec. 1. on the third floor of the Waldo Library, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs. Stop by the Waldo Library to browse a bookcase filled with artifacts, books and articles created by Native American authors. Free and open to the public. 
  • Día de los Muertos altar display—9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the second floor of the Waldo Library, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Department of Spanish. Come to observe a traditional altar constructed in observance of the Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead). Free and open to the public. 
  • "Little Word, Big Impact: Negotiating Gender-Neutral Pronouns in Education" Lyceum Lecture Series—noon to 1 p.m. in the Lee Honors College Lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College and the College of Education and Human Development. The lecture will be led by Dr. Lee Airton, assistant professor of gender and sexuality in education at Queen's University. Free and open to the public.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Mesa Española—3 to 4 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public.
  • "The Harm in Hate Speech" Ethics Book Club—6 p.m. in 2072 Moore Hall, hosted by the Center for the Study of Ethics and Society. Join a discussion of "The Harm in Hate Speech" by Jeremy Waldron led by Kathy Purnell, a part-time instructor in the School of Public Affairs and Administration. Registration required; free and open to the public. 
  • Community African dance class—7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. This community class which focuses on African dance encourages the entire family to attend. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public. 

Thursday, Nov. 2 

  • Día de los Muertos altar display—9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the second floor of the Waldo Library, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Department of Spanish. Come to observe a traditional altar constructed in observance of the Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead). Free and open to the public. 
  • "Race, Politics and NAFTA" presentation—noon in the Bernhard Center North Ballroom, hosted by the Walker Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnic Relations. The presentation will be given by James Russel, adjunct professor of political science in the Hatfield School of Government at Portland State University. Free and open to the public. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to women in the public. 
  • "Racial Socialization and the Power of Narrative" Real Talk Diversity Series—6 to 8 p.m. in the Trimpe Building Multicultural Center, hosted by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion. Join the WMU Student Assembly for Racial Equity and Cultural Inclusion in a critical conversation about the path to building a campus community that dismantles institutionalized racism and white supremacy in all its forms. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public. 
  • "A Man for All Seasons: Saladin, and How the West Made New Races; or Slavery, Sexual Mixing and Slave Dynasties" lecture—7 p.m. in 1028 Brown Hall, hosted by the Medieval Institute. The lecture will be given by Dr. Geraldine Heng, associate professor of English and comparative literature at the University of Texas. Free and open to the public. 
  • Gwen Frostic Reading Series: Reginald Edmund—7 p.m. in 157-158 Bernhard Center, hosted by the Department of English. This installment will feature Reginald Edmund, managing curating producer of Black Lives, Black Words International Project in Chicago. Free and open to the public. 

Friday, Nov. 3 

  • Día de los Muertos altar display—9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the second floor of the Waldo Library, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Department of Spanish. Come to observe a traditional altar constructed in observance of the Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead). Free and open to the public. 
  • International Ladies Sports Club—2 to 3 p.m. at the Student Recreation Center, hosted by International Student Activities. Bond with women from all over the world through sports and exercise. Free and open to all women in the community. 

Saturday, Nov. 4 

  • Día de los Muertos altar display—9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the second floor of the Waldo Library, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Department of Spanish. Come to observe a traditional altar constructed in observance of the Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead). Free and open to the public. 
  • Russian Cultural Expo and Conference—10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in 1028 Brown Hall, hosted by the Department of English and the Kalamazoo Russian Culture Association. The expo and conference will feature a series of lectures, a performance of a play and a reading set in 1917 Russia. Free and open to the public. 

Sunday, Nov. 5 

  • Día de los Muertos altar display—9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the second floor of the Waldo Library, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Department of Spanish. Come to observe a traditional altar constructed in observance of the Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead). Free and open to the public. 

Monday, Nov. 6 

  • Día de los Muertos altar display—9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the second floor of the Waldo Library, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Department of Spanish. Come to observe a traditional altar constructed in observance of the Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead). Free and open to the public. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Hispanic Film Festival 2017: "Chico and Rita"—4 p.m. in 1028 Brown Hall, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Department of Spanish. "Chico and Rita" is an animated film that looks at the Cuban revolution through the love story of Chico and Rita. Free and open to the public.  

Tuesday, Nov. 7 

  • Día de los Muertos altar display—9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the second floor of the Waldo Library, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Department of Spanish. Come to observe a traditional altar constructed in observance of the Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead). Free and open to the public. 
  • "Our Cosmic Roots: How did Humans Come to be on Planet Earth, and There to Next?" lecture—1:30 p.m. in D-115 Floyd Hall, hosted by the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences. The lecture will be given by Dr. Firouz Naderi, retired engineer from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Free and open to the public. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Mesa Española—4 to 5 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public. 
  • Hispanic Film Festival 2017: "No"—5 p.m. in 1028 Brown Hall, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Department of Spanish. "No" is based on the 1987 presidential campaign that brought an end to the dictatorship of General Pinochet in Chile. Free and open to the public.  
  • "The Left Hand of Darkness" Ethics Book Club—6 p.m. at the Central City Tap House, 359 S. Kalamazoo Mall, hosted by the Center for the Study of Ethics and Society. Join a discussion of "The Left Hand of Darkness" by Ursula LeGuin led by John Minser, curriculum coordinator at the WMU Homer Stryker M.D. School of Medicine. Registration required; free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, Nov. 8 

  • Día de los Muertos altar display—9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the second floor of the Waldo Library, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Department of Spanish. Come to observe a traditional altar constructed in observance of the Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead). Free and open to the public. 
  • "Promoting Resilience in Individuals and Couples with LGBTQ+ Identities" Lyceum Lecture Series—noon to 1 p.m. in the Lee Honors College Lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College. The lecture will be led by Dr. Gary Bischof, professor and dean of Lee Honors College, and Amber Mosley, coordinator of sexual assault prevention education at Sindecuse Health Center. Free and open to the public.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Mesa Española—3 to 4 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public.
  • "Top Five Threats to America's National Security" lecture—7 to 8:30 p.m. at WMU-Grand Rapids, Beltline, 2333 E. Beltline, hosted by the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan. The lecture will be given by Dr. Lori Murray, the former endowed chair for national security for the U.S. Naval Academy. Open to the public; free to WMU students, staff and faculty. 

Thursday, Nov. 9 

  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to women in the public. 
  • Hispanic Film Festival 2017: "Paraiso Travel"—6 p.m. in 1028 Brown Hall, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Department of Spanish. "Paraiso Travel" is based on the novel by Jorge Frano Ramos that follows a young couple on their journey from Colombia to enter the United States illegally. Free and open to the public.  
  • "Criminal Justice, Social Justice and Climate Justice" lecture—6 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Brown and Gold Room, hosted by the Study of Ethics in Society. The lecture will be given by Dr. Ron Kramer, professor of sociology at WMU. Free and open to the public. 

Friday, Nov. 10 

  • Women of Color Collaborative Luncheon—11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in Bernhard Center's South Ballroom, sponsored by the Women's Network of the Michigan American Council on Education. The event will feature key note speaker Dr. Judi Brown Clarke, diversity director for the National Science Foundation's Bio-Computational Evolution in Action Consortium Center headquartered at Michigan State University. Registration required, $60 tickets with discounts for WMU employees and students; open to the public. 
  • "Strategies to confront implicit biases and avoid micro-aggression" workshop—noon to 1:30 p.m. in 2033 University Computing Center, hosted by the Office of Faculty Development. This installment of the Teaching Inclusivity Series will be presented by Dr. Mariam Konaté, associate professor of gender and women's studies. Registration required; open to faculty, graduate students, administrators and administrative staff. 
  • "Youth Unemployment and Terrorism: Empirical Findings and Policy Implications" lecture—3 to 4 p.m. in 2212 Dunbar, sponsored by the Department of Economics, the Center for African Policy and Development Research and the Timothy Light Center for Chinese Studies. The lecture will be given by Dr. Sojo Adelaja, distinguished professor in land policy at Michigan State University. Free and open to the public. 

Saturday, Nov. 11 

  • Capoeira dance class—2 to 3:30 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library, 315 S. Rose Street, hosted by the Michigan Festival of Sacred Music. Capoeira is a Brazilian dance developed by escaped slaves in the 16th century and represents both a physical and spiritual liberation. Free and open to the public. Free and open to the public. 

Sunday, Nov. 12 

  • International Education Week: Western World Cup Tournament—1 to 7 p.m. at the Student Recreation Center, hosted by International Student Activities and Aspiras. The co-ed soccer tournament will kick off International Education Week at WMU and collect soccer donations for distribution by Aspiras to children in low income soccer clubs in the Dominican Republic. Registration is $5 per player; open to WMU students, staff and faculty. 

Monday, Nov. 13 

  • International Education Week: CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • International Education Week: International Taste Fest Potluck—5 to 7 p.m. in the Lee Honors College lounge, hosted by Lee Honors College and the Western Student Association. Registered Student Organizations are invited to provide food from the cultures represented by students in their organization. Free and open to the public.

Tuesday, Nov. 14  

  • International Education Week: CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • International Education Week: Mesa Española—4 to 5 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public. 
  • International Education Week: International Trivia Night—6 to 7:30 p.m. in 3508 Knauss Hall, hosted by the Study Abroad Alumni Ambassadors. Test your international knowledge with trivia from around the world. Food and prizes provided; free and open to the public. 
  • "Russia 2018: Putin's Last Act?" lecture—7 to 8:30 p.m. at the WMU-Grand Rapids, Beltline, 2333 E. Beltline Ave. S.E., hosted by the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan. The lecture will be given by John Beyrle, the former U.S. ambassador to Russia. Entrance $15; open to the public. 
  • Garba Dancing Night—7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Rootead Dance Studio, 1501 Fulford Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Garba Club. Join the Kalamazoo Garba club for a pop-up dance night to learn and practice the traditional folk dance from India. Entrance is $3; open to the public. 

Wednesday, Nov. 15  

  • "Transgender Stories" Lyceum Lecture Series—noon to 1 p.m. in the Lee Honors College Lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College. The panel-style session will be led by Sara Jacobs, program director of Out Proud Safe, Jay Maddock, executive director of OutFront Kalamazoo and Natalie Nguyen, director of WMU LBGT Student Services. Free and open to the public.
  • International Education Week: CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • International Education Week: Mesa Española—3 to 4 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public.
  • International Education Week: "What kind of language is Chinese?" lecture—4 p.m. in 2028 Brown Hall, hosted by the Confucius Institute at WMU. The lecture will be given by Dr. Wenfang Sun, director of the Confucius Institute at WMU. Free and open to the public. 
  • International Education Week: "Vision of Wisdom 2025: Achievements and Challenges of Bahir Dar University Becoming a Premier Research University in Africa" talk—4 to 5:30 p.m. in Sangren Hall, hosted by Center for African Policy Research, College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Economics and the Haenicke Institute for Global Education. The talk will be given by Dr. Matebe Tafere Gedifew, associate professor of educational policy and academic vice president at Bahir Dar University, Ethiopia. Free and open to the public. 
  • International Education Week: Japan Festival—4 to 7 p.m. at the New Wesley Foundation, 820 Rankin Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Japan Club. The festival will feature traditional foods and cultural activities prepared by the Japan Club at WMU. Free and open to the public. 
  • International Education Week: Rokugo performance—6 p.m. the New Wesley Foundation, 820 Rankin Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Soga Japan Center. Rakugo is a traditional Japanese comedy performance and will be performed by Kimochi, a professional Rakugo performer. Free and open to the public during the Japan Festival. 
  • Rose Ensemble and Piffaro—7 p.m. at the Chenery Auditorium, 714 S. Westnedge Ave., hosted by the Michigan Festival of Sacred Dance. The Rose Ensemble guides listeners through music of the first century of the Reformation after Martin Luther nailed his "95 Theses" to the door of the All Saints' Church in Wittenberg, Germany. Tickets start at $5; open to the public. 

Thursday, Nov. 16  

  • International Education Week: American Thanksgiving—noon to 2 p.m. at Kanley Chapel, hosted by the International Student Fellowship. Join international students at this annual dinner that explains how Thanksgiving fits in to U.S. culture and how it has changed throughout the years. Free and open to the public. 
  • International Education Week: CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to women in the public. 
  • International Education Week: "The discovery of Puerto Rico in 1493" talk—6:30 to 7:30 p.m. in 1750 Sangren Hall, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs. The talk will be given by Adriana Garriga-Lopez, associate professor of anthropology at Kalamazoo College. Free and open to the public. 
  • Dawud Wharnsby with The Red Sea Pedestrians—7 to 9 p.m. at the Dalton Theatre, Kalamazoo College, 1200 Academy St., hosted by the Michigan Festival of Sacred Music. Enjoy the music of Kalamazoo's Red Sea Pedestrians with internationally acclaimed Muslim artist, Dawud Wharnsby, that will touch on social justice issues and beliefs that transcend traditional faiths. Tickets start at $5; open to the public. 

Friday, Nov. 17  

  • International Education Week: "Dams Large and Small: Ecosystem Impacts on the World's Tropical River Systems" colloquium—3 to 4 p.m. in 2119 Wood Hall, hosted by the Department of Geography. The colloquium will feature Dr. Stephen K. Hamilton, professor of ecosystem ecology and biogeochemistry at the W.K. Kellogg Biological Station. Free and open to the public. 
  • International Education Week: Orchestra Rouh5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at 2452 Knauss Hall, hosted by the Refugee Outreach Collective and the Arabic Program. Don't miss a performance by Orchestra Rouh, an educational initiative of the Kalamazoo Symphony Orchestra that provides ongoing music instruction to children of Syrian and other refugee families in Kalamazoo. Free and open to the public.
  • International Education Week: China Night—6 to 8 p.m. at the Wesley Foundation, 2101 Wilbur Ave., hosted by the Chinese Association of Students and Scholars. Enjoy demonstrations of Chinese traditional culture through fashion, movies and other activities. Free and open to the public.

Saturday, Nov. 18

  • International Education Week: Dominican Night—5 to 8 p.m. in the Trimpe Building Multicultural Center, hosted by the Dominican Student Association. Join this showcase of Dominican food, dancing and overall culture. Food provided; free and open to the public. 
  • Pakistani Saqafat (Colors of Pakistan)—9 to 10 p.m. in the Trimpe Multicultural Center, hosted by the Pakistani Student Association. The event will include traditional Pakistani food, unique poetry from the region and history taught by Pakistani students. Entrance is $6, includes food and activities; open to the public. 

Sunday, Nov. 19

  • International Education Week: East Asian Pacific Festival—6 to 9 p.m. in the Student Recreation Center, hosted by the Malaysian Student Association. The festival will feature cultural presentations from the Malaysian Student Association, the Japan Club, the Indonesian Student Association, the Philippines Student Association, and the Chinese Association of Students and Scholars. Food provided; free and open to the public. 

Monday, Nov. 20

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.

Tuesday, Nov. 21

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.

Monday, Nov. 27 

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.

Tuesday, Nov. 28 

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Mesa Española—4 to 5 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, Nov. 29 

  • "Resisting Reconciliation: Queer Muslim Identity in America" Lyceum Lecture Series"—noon to 1 p.m. in the Lee Honors College Lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College. The lecture will be led by Mariam Mustafa, comparative religion graduate student. Free and open to the public.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Mesa Española—3 to 4 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public.

Thursday, Nov. 30 

  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to women in the public. 

For more WMU news, arts and events, visit wmich.edu/news.