Take advantage of global engagement opportunities in September

contact: Korey Force
| WMU News
Photo of three WMU students abroad in a mountainous region.

Don't miss the annual WMU Study Abroad Fair at 11 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 27, in Sangren Hall.

KALAMAZOO, Mich.—Western Michigan University and the extended Kalamazoo community will offer numerous global engagement opportunities in September. Highlights include a pop-up thrift shop and world bazaar, Chinese culture classes, a musical celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month, and events and outings with international students.

Global engagement at WMU

WMU prepares its students to thrive as global citizens and professionals in a diverse workplace by encouraging them to be locally oriented and globally competent, culturally aware, and ready to contribute to world knowledge and discovery. Opportunities to become globally engaged are published weekly at wmich.edu/global/events by WMU's Haenicke Institute for Global Education.

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September 2017 opportunities

Friday, Sept. 1

  • WMU Study Abroad classroom presentation Initiative—ongoing, hosted by WMU Study Abroad. WMU Study Abroad welcomes invitations to present in classrooms and can tailor presentations to as short as five minutes and as long as an hour based on each professor's needs. Request a presentation.
  • Registration opens for Chinese culture classes—Sept. 1-25, hosted by the Confucius Institute at WMU. The Confucius Institute offers Chinese culture classes that are open to WMU faculty, staff, students and the public. Half-price discount is available for WMU students and senior citizens (55 and above); open to the public.
  • "Our People, Our Land, Our Images" exhibit—daily through Oct. 22 at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo, sponsored by Warner, Norcross and Judd Attorneys at Law. The exhibit features firsthand photographic accounts from indigenous artists of North America, Peru, Iraq and New Zealand. Entrance is $5 for adults and $2 with a valid student ID; open to the public.

Saturday, Sept. 2

  • Rootead Pop-Up Thrift Shop and World Bazaar—10 a.m. to 7 p.m. at Rootead, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. Rootead will be selling donated worldly clothing, art, jewelry, home decor, food, drums and bath products. Free and open to the public.

Tuesday, Sept. 5

Friday, Sept. 8 

  • Fall 2017 welcome party for international students—1 to 3 p.m. at the Goldsworth Valley Pond, hosted by International Student Activities. Join International Student Activities in welcoming international students to the WMU campus and helping them navigate Bronco Bash. Food and beverages provided; free and open to the public.

Saturday, Sept. 9

  • International Student Activities travels to Saugatuck—9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Saugatuck, hosted by International Student Activities. Join International Student Activities in teaching the importance and fun of our Lake Michigan beaches. Registration required at intl-activities@wmich.edu; $10 registration includes transportation and lunch. Open to the public.
  • Fall Fab Fest—3 to 6 p.m. at the Trimpe Building Multicultural Center, hosted by the Lesbian, Bisexual, Gay and Transgender Student Services. Come and learn about the Harlem Ball and house tradition that gave rise to popular drag culture of the LGBTQ+ community. Food provided; free and open to the public.
  • St. Mary Polish Night—5 to 10 p.m. at Father Bartkowiak Hall, 939 Charlotte Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by the St. Mary Catholic Church. The event will feature Polish culture, entertainment and food. Admission is free, various food pricing options; open to the public.

Monday, Sept. 11

  • Japanese Conversation Table—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center, hosted by the Soga Japan Center. The conversation table provides a free opportunities to practice your Japanese language skills with students from Takasaki City University of Economics. Registration required; open to Japanese speakers and language learners.

Tuesday, Sept. 12

  • "American Foreign Policy in a Time of Fractured Politics" presentation—5:30 to 7:15 p.m. at the University Club, 111 Lyon Street NW, Grand Rapids, hosted by the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan. The presentation will be given by Colonel Philip J. (P.J.) Crowley, former assistant secretary for public affairs. Cost is $15; open to the public.
  • Tibetan Buddhist meditation and study group—7:15 to 8:30 p.m. at Sanctuary Yoga, 1919 Stearns Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by Western Michigan Jewel Heart. Explore in a practical way the practices associated with Tibetan Buddhism, including concentration, mindfulness, analysis and visualization. Free and open to the public.

Wednesday, Sept. 13

Thursday, Sept. 14

  • "China's Emerging Role in Global Agriculture" lecture—4 p.m. in 1028 Brown Hall, hosted by the Light Center for Chinese Studies. The lecture will be give by Dr. Fred Gale, senior economist for the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Free and open to the public.
  • Hispanic Heritage Month music celebration—6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Center Stage in the Bronco Mall of the Bernhard Center, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs. The event will kick off the celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month and will feature music from Spain and Latin America. Free and open to the public.
  • "Our Fires Still Burn" film screening—6:30 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts. The film invites viewers into the lives of contemporary Native Americans living in the Midwest. Free with museum admission; open to the public.

Friday, Sept. 15

  • Welcoming Michigan Statewide convening—8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Washtenaw Community College, 4800 E. Huron River Drive, Ann Arbor, hosted by Welcoming Michigan. Join the fourth annual gathering of community members and municipal partners to learn from each other and share promising practices around immigrant integration. Registration starts at $30; open to the public.
  • "China's Pork Industry: A Globalization Story" talk—noon in 204 Bernhard Center, hosted by the Light Center for Chinese Studies, the Department of Geography, the Department of Economics, the Confucius Institute at WMU, the food and consumer packaged goods marketing program, and the Haenicke Institute for Global Education. The talk will be given by Dr. Fred Gale, senior economist for the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Free and open to the public.

Saturday, Sept. 16

  • Kalamazoo Hispanic Fiesta—11 a.m. to 9 p.m. in Bronson Park, 200 S. Rose St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and Despierta Kalamazoo. The fiesta will include a variety of musical performances, food for purchase and games. Free and open to the public.

Sunday, Sept. 17

  • "Our People, Our Land, Our Images" gallery tour—2 to 3 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts. Join a docent-led tour of the exhibit which includes 51 works by 26 indigenous photographers from Canada, Iraq, New Zealand and the U.S. Free with museum admission; open to the public.

Monday, Sept. 18

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Multicultural meet-and-greet—6 to 9 p.m. on the second floor of the Bernhard Center, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs. The event offers opportunities to build relationships with students of color, connect with multicultural RSOs, hear success stories from faculty and alumni of color and learn about local resources. Free and open to the public.

Tuesday, Sept. 19

  • ARTbreak: "Dancing for My Tribe: Potawatomi Tradition in Modern Times"—noon at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts. A Tribal Member of Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Sharon Hoogstraten, describes her five-year photographic portrait of Potawatomi Native Americans. Free and open to the public.
  • Ice cream social with international students—2 to 4 p.m. at Kanley Chapel, hosted by International Student Activities. Join international students for ice cream, raffles and games. Free and open to the public.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Tibetan Buddhist meditation and study group—7:15 to 8:30 p.m. at Sanctuary Yoga, 1919 Stearns Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by Western Michigan Jewel Heart. Explore in a practical way the practices associated with Tibetan Buddhism, including concentration, mindfulness, analysis and visualization. Free and open to the public.

Wednesday, Sept. 20

  • Local Global Market—10 to 2 p.m. at the Sangren Pedestrian Mall, hosted by International Student Activities. Area farmers will bring fresh fruits and produce to campus for purchase. Email wayne.l.bond@wmich.edu for questions. Free and open to the public.
  • Lyceum Lecture Series: "Legal Issues for the LGTQ+ Community"—noon to 1 p.m. in the Lee Honors College Lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College. The lecture will be led by Jay Kaplan, director of the ACLU Michigan LGBT Project, and Frank Aielle, professor of law at WMU Cooley Law School. Free and open to the public.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Ethics Book Club: "Black and Blue: the Origins and Consequences of Medical Racism"—6 p.m. in the WMed Information Commons, hosted by the Center for the Study of Ethics and Society. Join a discussion of "Black and Blue: the Origins and Consequences of Medical Racism" by John Hoberman, led by Keagan Potts, a master's student in philosophy. Registration required; free and open to the public.

Thursday, Sept. 21

  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to women in the public.
  • "To the People, Food is Heaven: Politics and Quotidian Life in Recent Chinese History" lecture—4:30 p.m. in 1028 Brown Hall, hosted by the Light Center for Chinese Studies. The lecture will be given by Dr. Hanchao Lu, professor of history at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Free and open to the public.
  • Alma Latina 40 years celebration—4:30 to 6 p.m. at the WMUK-FM studio, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs. The reception will celebrate 40 years of the Alma Latina radio program, the longest Spanish-language radio show in the Kalamazoo area. Free and open to the public.

Friday, Sept. 22

  • "Crossing the 1949 Dividing Line: A New Trend in the Study of Modern China" talk—noon in 204 Bernhard Center, hosted by the Light Center for Chinese Studies, the Department of History, the Confucius Institute at WMU and the Haenicke Institute for Global Education. The lecture will be given by Dr. Hanchao Lu, director of the China Research Center in Atlanta and professor of history at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Free and open to the public.

Sunday, Sept. 24

  • "Women Warriors" Portraits by Hung Liu" gallery tour—2 to 3 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts. Join a docent-led tour of the exhibit, which presents visions of determined, strong and beautiful warriors. Free with museum admission; open to the public.

Monday, Sept. 25

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.

Tuesday, Sept. 26

  • Real Talk Diversity Series: "Surpassing Certainty"—11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Trimpe Building Multicultural Center, hosted by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion. Join a discussion of "Surpassing Certainty" by Janet Mock, facilitated by Natalie Nguyen, director of the Office for Lesbian, Bisexual, Gay and Transgender Student Services, and Lindsay Palar, program coordinator for the Office of Diversity and Inclusion. Lunch and copies of the book will be provided to a limited number of registered participants; free and open to the public.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Tibetan Buddhist meditation and study group—7:15 to 8:30 p.m. at Sanctuary Yoga, 1919 Stearns Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by Western Michigan Jewel Heart. Explore in a practical way the practices associated with Tibetan Buddhism, including concentration, mindfulness, analysis and visualization. Free and open to the public.

Wednesday, Sept. 27

  • WMU Study Abroad Fair—11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in Sangren Hall, hosted by WMU Study Abroad. Attendees will get a chance to speak with WMU students who have studied and interned abroad, WMU professors who coordinate programs and courses abroad and advisors who help guide students in fitting study abroad in to their program of study. Food provided; free and open to the public.
  • Lyceum Lecture Series: "The Queer Transformation of College Campuses, 1950s to Present"—noon to 1 p.m. in the Lee Honors College Lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College. The lecture will be led by Dr. Susan Freeman, WMU associate professor and chair of gender and women's studies. Free and open to the public.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.

Thursday, Sept. 28

  • HACU National Internship Program presentation—10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in 204 Bernhard Center, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs. Jonathan D. Santeliz, the national executive director for the Hispanic Association for Colleges and Universities National Internship Program, will present the many opportunities offered by the program. Free and open to the public.
  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to women in the public.
  • "The Search for Resistance and Reconciliation" talk—6:30 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts and the Kalamazoo College Department of Art and Art History. Artist Erica Lord will discuss her past and current work that explores displacement, cultural identity and cultural limbo.
  • The Promise of Education Series: "In Defense of Ideals"—7 p.m. in 3502 Knauss Hall, hosted by the University Center for the Humanities. Join Mark Edmundson as he discusses courage, compassion and wisdom in the works of Homer, the Gospels, Plato and Socrates. Free and open to the public.