Princeton Review lauds Haworth College of Business

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Photo of WMU's Schneider Hall.

Schneider Hall, home of the Haworth College of Business

KALAMAZOO—The Princeton Review has named Western Michigan University's Haworth College of Business to its list of "The Best 295 Business Schools" for 2014.

The Princeton Review selected the college of business based on a high regard for its academic programs and the company's review of institutional data, says Robert Franek, Princeton Review senior vice president of publishing. The company also considered student opinions on an 80-question survey examining such things as academics, student body and campus life.

"We recommend the Haworth College of Business as one of the best institutions a student could attend to earn a business school degree," Franek says.

The college is proud to once again make the list and to be recognized for its MBA program, says Dr. Satish Deshpande, the college's associate dean for operations and graduate programs.

"The quality of our curriculum, which is informed by industry experience, draws high-quality students to our program year after year," Deshpande says.

The Princeton Review

The 2014 edition has two-page profiles of the schools with write-ups on their academics, student life and admissions. In the Haworth College of Business profile , the editors note, "Word of mouth plays a big part in many students' decision to attend Western Michigan University with great recommendations from family and friends. One student was even referred to the school by a CEO. Most students seem quite happy with their choice."

"The Best 295 Business Schools" is among a line of more than 150 Princeton Review books published by Random House that also includes "The Best 169 Law Schools ," and "The Best 167 Medical Schools."

The Haworth College of Business is one of the largest colleges of business in the country, offering an extensive alumni and professional network to students and graduates. The innovative and responsive curriculum draws upon industry expertise and needs so that graduates are prepared to be the critical thinkers, effective problem solvers and thought leaders that today's businesses are seeking.