William W. Liou, Ph.D.

 


Title: Advanced Digital Hydraulic Hybrid Drive System

Principal Investigator: William W. Liou

Co-Principal Investigator: Peter Gustafson, John Bair

Sponsor: Eaton Corporation

Period: 2009-2010

Component simulations and reliability of hydraulic hybrid drive system.

 

Title: Ground Vehicle Fatigue Modeling, Blast Wave Simulation, Sensor Data Analysis, and Structural Optimization for Reliability, Safety and CBM

Project Director: William W. Liou (CAViDS)

Sponsor: Tank Automotive Research Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC), RDECOM, U.S. Army

Period: 2009-2010

 

Title: Dual-Use Ground Vehicle Conditional-Based Maintenance

Project Director: William W. Liou (CAViDS)

Sponsor: Tank Automotive Research Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC), RDECOM, U.S. Army

Period: 2009-2010

 

Title: Dual-Use Ground Vehicle Reliability Prediction and Optimazation, Tank Elastomer Pads Fatigue, and Vehicle Occupant Shock Wave Impact Load Prediction

Project Director: William W. Liou (CAViDS)

Sponsor: Tank Automotive Research Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC), RDECOM, U.S. Army

Period: 2009-2010

 

Title: Physics-Based Wall Layer Modeling for Large Eddy Simulations of Flows over Rough Wall

Principal Investigator: William W. Liou

Sponsor: Office of Naval Research (ONR), U.S. Navy

Period: 2008-2010

Surface roughness poses a major challenge to numerical simulations.  This is particularly serious for direct simulations such as large eddy simulation (LES) and direct numerical simulation (DNS). In comparison with the abundance of research on LES wall models for smooth walls, there have been significantly less efforts that focus on developing mathematical modeling for rough walls. New flow physics-based surface roughness modeling for LES numerical calculations of the high Reynolds number flow over rough surfaces are to be developed.

 

Title: Aerothermal Simulations of the L-3 AVDS Engine Cooling Fan

Principal Investigator: William W. Liou

Sponsor:CAViDS Consortium

Period: 2008-2009

Computational simulations of the aerothermal characteristics of cooling fan unit.

 

Title: Continuous Monitoring Wireless and Communication Devices for Blood Glucose

Principal Investigator: Murali Ghantasala

Co-Principal Investigator: Ajay Gupta, William W. Liou

Sponsor: WMU Research Foundation, OVPR Technology Development Fund, and the Michigan Initiative for Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Period: 2008

 

Title: CFD Studies of Truck Clutch Housing

Principal Investigator: William W. Liou

Sponsor:CAViDS Consortium

Period: 2007-2008

Computational simulations of the flow in truck clutch housing.

 

Title: CFD of Air Flow in Automotive Intake Air Ducts

Principal Investigator: William W. Liou

Sponsor:CAViDS Consortium

Period: 2007

Computational simulations of the flow in automotive intake ducts 

 

Title: Simulations of Oil Flow in Heavy-Duty Tandem Axle

Principal Investigator: William W. Liou

Sponsor:CAViDS Consortium

Period: 2007-2008

Computational simulations of the oil flow in commercial truck axle.

 

Title: Heavy Truck Rollover Characterization

Principal Investigator: William W. Liou

Sponsor: National Transportation Research Center, Inc, Oak Ridge National Lab.

Period: 2007-2008

 

Title:  Simulation-Based Heavy-Duty Truck Structural Reliability Analysis, Track Pin Bushing Fatigue, and

HMMWV Underbody Scanning

Project Director: William W. Liou (CAViDS)

Sponsor: Tank Automotive Research Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC), RDECOM, U.S. Army

Period: 2007-2008

 

Title: Airfoil Flow Control Using Flexible Extended Trailing Edge

            Principal Investigator: Tianshu Liu

Co-Principal Investigator: William W. Liou, Qamar Shams

Sponsor: Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), U.S. Air Force

Period: 2006-2009

The proposed research will study a feasible physical mechanism for flow separation control (or stall control) of an airfoil section and a wing at high angles of attack using a flexible, extended trailing edge of polymer membrane embedded with micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) sensors and actuators.

 

Title: Capillary Effects in Multilayered Micro Porous Media

Principal Investigator: Peter Parker

Co-Principal Investigator: William W. Liou

Sponsor: Procter & Gamble Company

Period: 2007-2009

Rigid capillary dewatering removes water from paper web without compaction of the fiber furnish.  The surface wetting through the multilayered structure of porous media with distributed micron-sized pores will be studied. 

 

Title: New Rough Wall Layer Modeling Using the Brinkman’s Equation

Principal Investigator: William W. Liou

Sponsor: Office of Naval Research (ONR), U.S. Navy

Period: 2005-2008

Surface roughness exists on many Naval vehicle platforms. Compared to the flow over smooth surfaces surface roughness influence the flow structures in the turbulent boundary layer around the platform and causes the increases of drag and wall heat transfer.  In this study, the fluid dynamics of the flow over rough wall will be examined using model Brinkman’s equation.

 

Title: Turbine Engine Laboratory Enhancement for Aero-Propulsion Education

Principal Investigator: William W. Liou

Sponsor: Michigan Space Grant Consortium

Period: 2004-2005

To enrich the undergraduate aeropropulsion curriculum, a student-centered effort to build a miniturbojet engine was initiated.  The student group consists of two undergraduates majoring in aeronautical engineering.  The engine selected is the WREN 54 turbojet engine, which delivers 12lb of thrust at 160,000 RPM.  The activities involve (1) building the engine hardware and the test stand and (2) develop data acquisition system for the engine. The group has assembled all of the engine components. The entire setup is successfully completed in September 2003 and has been used for the Aeropropulsion System class (AAE466) at Western Michigan University in Fall 2003.  During each of the engine runs, the students (seniors) are responsible for starting and operating the engine, monitoring engine status and recording data. In this proposal, we seek supplementary funding to support an enhancement of the mini-turbojet engine that we have built with an add-on turbofan unit. 

 

Title: Simulations of Flow Transition over Underwater Bodies

Principal Investigator: William W. Liou

Sponsor: Office of Naval Research (ONR), U.S. Navy

Period: 2002-2003

The transition of flow from a laminar state to a turbulent state impacts directly the hydrodynamic and the acoustic characteristics of both manned and unmanned underwater vehicles.  It is relevant to several Future Naval Capabilities (FNC), such as Platform Protection, Littoral Antisubmarine Warfare, and Electrical Warship and Combat Vehicles. Numerical computations of the transitional flow over the HiFoil lifting surface of the Office of Naval Research will be performed by using the Reynolds-average Navier-Stokes equations and transition models. The study is expected to provide information such as expectable variation of flow transition between water-tunnel testing and the actual operation environment.

 

Title: DSMC Simulations of Laminar Flow Breakdown on Space Transport Systems

Principal Investigator: William W. Liou

Sponsor: NASA Langley Research Center

Period: 2001-2004

Transitional boundary layers are believed to have caused high thermal fluxes at the surface of reentry vehicles.  The increased heat transfer can have a significant impact on the aerodynamic design and the thermal protection system of high speed RLV.  Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is a well-established method and has been used extensively in the simulations of rarefied gas flows over reentry vehicles.  In this activity, the DSMC method is used for studying the breakdown of laminar flows over RLV types of space transport systems.

 

Title: Unified LES/RANS Approach Using the Conservation Element and Solution Element (CE/SE) Method

Principal Investigator: William W. Liou

Sponsor: NASA Glenn Research Center

Period: 2001-2002

The CE/SE method, which is originated at NASA Glenn Research Center, represents a revolutionary development in the field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD).  By invoking both the integral and the differential dorms of the Navier-Stokes equations, the CE/SE method enforces the conservation of fluxes in spaces and time in a unified manner.  The method is a first-of-the-kind in applying the concept of space-time flux conservation, which is at the root of the Navier-Stokes equations, as a foundation to construct a CFD method.  The goal of the research is to develop an advanced large eddy simulations (LES) capability for complex problems using the CE/SE method.

 

Title: Bursting Frequency Prediction in Turbulent Boundary Layers

Principal Investigator: William W. Liou

Sponsor:  Sandia National Laboratories, U.S. Department of Energy

Period: 1999-2002

Experimental results have shown that the development of turbulent boundary layers is dominated by coherent streamwise structures.  The research seeks to predict the bursting frequency of such events in incompressible as well as compressible turbulent boundary layers using the direct resonance theory.

 

Title: Heat Transfer in Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS)

Principal Investigator: William W. Liou

Sponsor: Michigan Space Grant Consortium

Period: 2000-2001

In most MEMS devices, the mean free path of the molecules is of the same order of magnitude as the system size.  The Knudsen number for the fluid flows in such devices is high and the fluid motions are in the transitional regime.  This research seeks to achieve a better understanding of the heat transfer phenomena in MEMS using two different approaches: (1) the Burnett Equations; (2) Direct Simulations Monte Carlo Simulations.

 

Title: Calculation of the Flow Transition and Separation over Two-Dimensional Multi-Element Airfoils

Principal Investigator: William W. Liou

Sponsor:  NASA Langley Research Center

Period: 1998-2000

High-lift aerodynamics has been a critical element in the design of civil as well as military aircrafts. The cascade arrangement of the multi-element airfoil creates mutual flow interference between the elements. Phenomena such as flow transition from laminar to turbulent and flow separation interact strongly. Understanding and predicting these complex flow phenomena are not only fundamentally important to fluid sciences but also critical in the search for an increased margin of efficiency for multi-element airfoil. This research involves the computational study of these phenomena.


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