Marcus Johnson

When it comes to the path of his academic career, recent graduate Marcus Johnson (M.F.A., Creative Writing, and M.A., Educational Leadership) considers himself a “wanderer.” In addition to his military service in the Army National Guard, Marcus has pursued graduate study in the seminary, in secondary education, creative writing, and most recently, higher education and student affairs. His decision to attend WMU provided even further opportunities, as Marcus has worked as an Assistant Director of the Writing Center, as a Student Services Coordinator for WMU Financial Aid, and has participated in the Prague Summer Program. Reflecting on his winding path, Marcus observes, “I think it still all plays into who I am right now… it shaped the professional I’ve become; it shaped the academic I think I’m becoming.” His patience and curiosity about a variety of career paths has certainly benefited him, for shortly after Marcus graduated in April 2013 with his Master’s degree in Educational Leadership, he was hired as an admissions counselor at Kalamazoo College.

a photo of Marcus Johnson
Marcus Johnson

In 2007, in the midst of completing an M.F.A. in Creative Writing at WMU, Marcus found his graduate program delayed when he was deployed to Camp Liberty in Iraq. Upon returning, Marcus contacted WMU’s Office of Military and Veterans’ Affairs (OMVA) and found a great level of support from the office’s new director, Tracey Quada. Marcus is effusive in his praise for the advocacy and resources of the office, stating that Quada and the OMVA itself made “Western a much more veteran-friendly campus, instituting policies and connecting veterans with resources that were meant to help them during their college experience. With the OMVA, I see in that office a much stronger initiative to engage with student vets and to help them.”
And he isn’t alone in his praise for the office; just last year, Military Times’ EDGE magazine named Western as one of the “Best for Vets” schools in the nation (one of only two schools from Michigan to make the list). The skills, determination, and experience that student veterans bring to college campuses make them an invaluable addition to university communities, and WMU is making a notable effort to smooth these students’ transitions back to academic life. Marcus says, “I’m starting to see that some of the services that we’re offering, they indicate and show that we are trying to become more aware of [their] needs, and we are trying to understand those different experiences, and how those experiences can impact the individual education of student veterans as well as how it impacts the overall university community.”
As a teacher and a writer in that university community, Marcus finds his military experience re-framing the ways he thinks about and approaches his academic work. Speaking about how his military training influenced his teaching preparation, Marcus recalls that “I approached tasks like teaching or writing or studying from a really practical, pragmatic approach, so I would sit down and read a piece of literature, and I would think, what’s the purpose? What’s it going to serve? How am I going to be able to use this tool? How can I use this resource? It’s also something that carries over into the way [...] I get students to think about writing, to think about research. I want them to start thinking about writing and research in very pragmatic terms, in very practical terms, so that it’s something they actually do for a purpose. Because I think that activity– any activity you do in life– there has to be a significant purpose to it, but especially for the time you invest in writing, just like the time I invested in the military, there has to be a significant purpose, there has to be a significant meaning.”
Part of that search for meaning has also unfolded in the pages of Marcus’s memoir. His experience in Iraq is the basis for his creative non-fiction work, Pogue, a book about the intersections of war, training, gender, and relationships from the perspective of a soldier who does not leave the military base. Planning to finish the book soon, Marcus will no doubt have a full and promising future as he moves forward with his new job, new writing projects, and hopefully, a continuing urge to wander and explore.

Video Feature: Marcus Johnson Interview

Amanda Shuman

Math teachers…rebellious? Those words don’t often go together in our minds, but Amanda Shuman remembers her math teachers as rebels who kept the class engaged with their lively teaching style. Since she took to math naturally and found herself two or three grade levels ahead of her classmates, she decided to pursue math as a career. After receiving a master’s degree in mathematics at WMU, she is living in Washington D.C. as a Math for America DC (MƒA DC) fellow. She will be following a five-year program in which college graduates and working professionals commit to teaching math in public secondary schools. All fellows are mathematically talented individuals who are new to teaching.

a photo of Amanda Shuman
Amanda Shuman

During the first year of the fellowship, MƒA DC fellows receive a full scholarship to the American University in Washington D.C. Tuition and fees for the degree, a Master’s in Teaching in Secondary Education: Mathematics, are completely covered. Fellows receive a living stipend for the training year. Fellows will have pre-service professional development and mentoring as well as extensive student teaching experience during the training year. Development and training continue through the training year.
During years two through five, MƒA DC fellows will teach in a Washington D.C. public or public charter school at the secondary level. Fellows will receive a stipend in addition to a regular full-time teacher’s salary in the city. Besides the stipend and salary, mentoring, coaching and support services are available for fellows. They are expected to participate in ongoing, interactive, professional development activities as well.
Amanda hails from Montrose, Michigan and completed her undergraduate work at Aquinas College in Grand Rapids, Michigan. She always found herself drawn to mathematics and she gathered experience in teaching math by tutoring at her high school during her junior and senior years. She was a teaching assistant for the Department of Mathematics at WMU and part of her duties there included tutoring in the math lab. As a TA, she taught math to non-math majors. Finite and Pre-Calculus were also within the scope of her teaching experience. One thing she wants to do in her career is encourage young women and girls to a love of math. She found the lack of women in math classes and in university settings disheartening, and she wants to increase visibility for women in mathematics.
Studying at WMU, a large, diverse university, was very different from her undergraduate work at Aquinas. Here at Western in a male dominated profession, she felt somewhat isolated. She knew that if she wanted to advance her position in life she would have to do it on her own, and she did so by working out her problems in “self-study.” Diving into something she enjoyed, mathematics, provided an antidote to the inevitable difficult issues that came up during her graduate study at WMU. She was unable to participate much in campus life, as she lived in Grand Rapids and commuted to school in Kalamazoo. She notes that public transportation in Washington, D.C. is more comprehensive than anything available in this area of Michigan, though the cost of living in the city is much higher.
Amanda counts several professors and graduate assistants as major influences on her. She notes that Dr. Steven Culver, then chair of the math department, and Dan Sievewright and Shelley Speiss, both now holding the Ph.D., were greatly encouraging. She also singled out for praise two “amazing teachers who kept me going.” The first was Dr. Jay Wood. “He is an extraordinary professor who was willing to work with me to catch up with the other students and was always patient with me. He answered even the most mundane questions and constantly encouraged me to continue working hard.” The second teacher who bolstered Amanda’s confidence was Dr. Melinda Koelling, with whom she worked on complex analysis. Amanda had not had much success in complex analysis in her previous classes, but Dr. Keolling gave her the guidance to understand concepts she had not previously grasped. Dr. Koelling’s presence at math club and other departmental events was motivating, as well.
Amanda earned no less than 18 scholarships and just as many non-cash awards during her undergraduate work at Aquinas, and at Western was involved as a member of the Teaching Assistants Union and of Pi Mu Epsilon, an honorary national mathematics society promoting scholarly activity in mathematics. Now, as a Math for America Fellow, she will be using her talents to further mathematics education in K-12 settings. The Graduate College at Western Michigan University is proud to call her one of our own, and wishes her great success in her future endeavors.

Dr. Amy Gullickson, Ph.D. in Interdisciplinary Evaluation

Dr. Amy Gullickson received her Ph.D. in Interdisciplinary Evaluation (IDPE) in December, 2010. Following her graduation she worked in the College of Education and Human Development as the Senior Research Associate to the Dean and served as a graduate faculty member for the college’s Educational Leadership, Research and Technology department. In November 2012 she moved to Australia to take a tenure track position as Senior Lecturer at the Center for Program Evaluation at the University of Melbourne.

A photo of Dr. Amy Gullickson

As a professional evaluator, Amy’s job is to help organizations understand the effects of their actions. She serves as independent observer, reviewing context, activities, and results. She then gives reports on what they are doing right or wrong and recommendations on how they might improve. She gained experience doing evaluation in a variety of settings throughout her PhD program, including four months in Southeast Asia over four years as a team member on the Heifer International Impact evaluation. Through Heifer International, people in developing countries receive gifts of animals, from ducks to pigs to bees, learn how to raise and care for them, and then pass on the gift of animals and training to another family. As she talked to farmers, government officials, and non-governmental organizations, she learned valuable lessons about working with people from different cultures and languages on an evaluation project.
Also during her PhD work, Amy was fortunate to study at The Evaluation Center with several of the field’s foundational thinkers: Dr. Daniel Stufflebeam, Dr. Michael Scriven, and Dr. James Sanders (who served on her dissertation committee). Her dissertation, “Mainstreaming Evaluation: Four Case Studies of Systematic Evaluation Integrated into Organizational Culture and Practices,” explored evaluative practices in National Science Foundation-funded Advanced Technological Education centers. Due to the interdisciplinary nature of the IDPE, she found one of her biggest challenges was to put together a dissertation committee. Dr. Nick Andreadis, Dean of Lee Honors College served as her committee chair, with committee members Dr. Sanders, and Dr. Chris Coryn, Assistant Professor in Education, Measurement and Research and Director of the IDPE program.
As Senior Research Associate to the Dean of the College of Education and Human Development, Amy interviewed all faculty and staff to understand the culture and practice of the various departments with regard to evaluation. She then debriefed the various departments with her findings in order to help them move forward with creating systems to collect evaluative data for strategic planning, continuous improvement, and to provide evidence of their impact. Her data analysis has also been used to inform college level strategic planning.
When asked what she had gained from the Graduate College, Amy stated that she was grateful to receive two travel grants, which she used to attend the American Evaluation Association Annual Conference. In addition, she participated in a dissertation writing workshop sponsored by the Graduate College. She encourages all graduate students to take advantage of the dissertation formatting workshops sponsored by the Graduate College and run by Jennifer Holm, Coordinator of Theses and Dissertations. Amy states that she did not attend one of the formatting workshops, usually offered several times in the Fall and Spring semesters, and wishes she had!

Louise Schuster 91 – Awarded Second Master’s Degree

Louise Schuster got the surprise of her long life when Dean Susan Stapleton of the Graduate College at Western Michigan University showed up at her door to deliver Mrs. Schuster’s third diploma. At 91 years of age, Mrs. Schuster had already earned a Bachelor of Science in 1968 and a Master of Arts in 1969 from Western. She had also completed coursework toward a Master’s degree in Literacy Studies through 1980, but had never gotten that degree. With only imaged transcripts from 1962 through 1980 to work with, some detective work was needed.

A photo of Louise Schuster being presented her diploma by Susan Stapleton, Dean of the Graduate College

Enter Mallory Bourdo, Academic Auditor in the Registrar’s Office and Lauren Freedman, Professor in the Department of Special Education and Literary Studies, College of Education and Human Development. They combed through Mrs. Schuster’s records, evaluated her credits, and found she had enough credits to receive a Master of Arts in Literacy Studies. With the help of Carrie Cumming, Senior Associate Registrar, and Stacey Doxtater, Graduation Auditing Supervisor, a decision was made to issue a diploma for June 2012. Mallory worked with the family, especially Mrs. Schuster’s granddaughter, Darcy Kelly, to make sure Mrs. Schuster would receive her diploma, and between all parties they agreed to have the diploma hand-delivered to Mrs. Schuster in her Sturgis home by Dean Susan Stapleton. Mrs. Schuster knew she would be receiving a diploma, but did not know it would be delivered to her home with pomp and circumstance. With her family surrounding her, Louise Schuster finally received her second Master of Arts and her third diploma, in its ceremonial cover, made possible by her hard work and the efforts of Western Michigan University faculty, staff, and administrators.

Dr. Antonio R. Flores

2003 Distinguished Alumni Dr. Antonio R. Flores, M.A. 1977, President and CEO of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU), traveled to Michigan with his bachelor’s degrees in business administration from Universidad de Guadalajara and in elementary education from Centro Normal Regional, Mexico in the mid-seventies.

a photo of Dr. Antonio R. Flores

Dr. Antonio R. Flores

When he first came to Michigan, he was director of the Upward Bound program at Hope College in Holland. He characterizes himself as “very green” and says he didn’t know very much English and found the U.S. educational system challenging, though he was working in academia. The head counselor at Holland High School suggested to him that Western Michigan University had an excellent program in Counselor Education and Personnel (now Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology). He decided to try it to become more familiar with higher educational practices and counseling skills which he needed for his job working with needy youth. He found that the program, faculty and students were a tremendous help to him in developing his communication and counseling skills. He drove from Holland to Kalamazoo for every class, and completed his master’s degree while working full time for Upward Bound. He found that the skills and knowledge he was acquiring while at Western were applicable every day in his job, so he learned very quickly, improving his skills and his job performance daily. According to Dr. Flores, it was not the typical student experience, as he was working full time and commuting, but he got so much out of it that he felt it was very valuable.

Dr. Flores went on to earn his Ph.D. in higher education administration from University of Michigan and holds the prestigious position of President and CEO of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, which represents more than 400 colleges and universities that are committed to Hispanic higher education success in the United States, Puerto Rico, Latin America, Spain and Portugal. In 2012 he marked his 16th anniversary in this position, and is very highly regarded by his peers. The editors of Hispanic Engineer & Information Technology magazine chose him over hundreds of candidates in government, academia, and the corporate world as one of the “50 Most Important Hispanics in Business and Technology.” Hispanic Business Magazine named him one of the “100 Most Influential Hispanics in the United States.” He has also received numerous awards for leadership and advocacy for higher education access, equity, and success for Hispanics, the nation’s youngest and fastest growing minority.

Dr. Flores has also chaired the Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility (HACR), which is a coalition of the most prominent Hispanic organizations promoting Hispanic leadership initiatives and the equitable representation of Hispanics in corporate America. Along with his many other accomplishments, he is also chair of the ¡Adelante! U.S. Education Leadership Fund. This organization offers leadership and professional career development training to top Hispanic college students. Another initiative of which Dr. Flores is a founding leader is the Alliance for Equity in Higher Education. This is the nation’s first unified voice for the college and career development needs of minority college students and the capacity building requirements of Minority-Serving Institutions.

Dr. Flores also serves on national government boards, including the Homeland Security Academic Advisory Council, the State Department’s 100 Thousand Strong Initiative with China, the 100 Thousand Strong Initiative with Latin America and the Caribbean, and the US Intelligence Community Advisory Council on Diversity and Inclusion.

When I asked about his days here at Western Michigan University back in the 1970’s, I thought Dr. Flores would barely remember them. But he said, to the contrary, it was a seminal experience and a springboard for him to go on to earning his Ph.D. and to further success in his career. While he no longer has the opportunity to work with many students in his administrative position, he does travel to lots of conferences held by HACU and by other institutions where students are presenting their work, and he makes every effort to interact with students at those venues.  HACU sponsors the largest internship program in the US, with up to 700 students annually, so that is another way he has contact with young people. His favorite part is attending commencements. He says, “Commencements inspire me the most; to see all those happy faces charged up to go out and conquer the world.”