Wei-Chiao Huang

Photo of Wei-Chiao  Huang
Wei-Chiao Huang
Professor of Economics
Office: 
(269) 387-5528
Location: 
5424 Friedmann Hall, Mail Stop 5330
Mailing address: 
Department of Economics
Western Michigan University
1903 W Michigan Ave
Kalamazoo MI 49008-5330 USA
Education: 
  • Ph.D., University of California-Santa Barbara, 1984
Research interests: 
  • Labor economics
  • Applied microeconomics
Bio: 

Dr. Wei-Chiao Huang is a professor in the Department of Economics at Western Michigan University.

He has taught a variety of courses since joining the department in 1985. At the undergraduate level, he has taught:

  • Econometrics
  • Intermediate microeconomics
  • Labor economics
  • Managerial economics
  • Principles of microeconomics
  • Public finance
  • Studies in Asian economies

At the master's level, he has taught:

  • Econometrics
  • Graduate seminar in economics
  • Mathematical economics
  • Price theory

At the Ph.D. level, he has taught human resources (labor field course) levels I and II, and economics workshops.

In addition, he has taught as a:

  • Visiting professor at Guangxi University and Macau University of Science and Technology, China.
  • Visiting Research Fellow at National Tsing-Hua University, Taiwan.
  • Winrock Foundation professor at China Agricultural University, Beijing.
  • Fulbright visiting professor at National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan.

Huang was also conferred Honorary Distinguished Professor by Xibei (Northwestern) University, China, in July 1997.

Huang's current research areas are on various labor market issues, marital formation and dissolution, household production approach to analyzing seemingly non-economic human behavior, and scientific validity of Chinese astrology.

His research and publications deal with:

  • Brain drain (non-return of foreign professionals)
  • Charitable behavior
  • Economics of immigration
  • Employment changes and earnings
  • Local economic development initiatives (enterprise zones)
  • Mortality and suicide
  • Research and development efficiency
  • Superstition or ancient science (testing the scientific validity of Chinese astrology)
  • University ranking
  • Various issues related to China's economic reforms