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Undergraduate Program in Africana Studies

Courses and descriptions

AFS 2000 Introduction and Foundations to Africana Studies
AFS 2100 Comparative Approaches to Forms of Black Consciousness
AFS 2140 Origins of the Modern Civil Rights Movement
AFS 2230 African American Literature/Criticism and Culture
AFS 2240 Africana Autobiography
AFS 2350 Black Majorities in the Caribbean and Latin America
AFS 3000 Black Experience: From the African Beginnings to 1865
AFS 3010 Black Experience: From 1866 to the Present
AFS 3070 Poetics and Politics of Gender in Islam
AFS 3100 The Black Woman: Historical Perspective and Contemporary Status
AFS 3130 Radical Activism and the Black Community
AFS 3140 The Black Community
AFS 3150 The Underground Railroad in the Midwest
AFS 3220 West Africa in Colonial America
AFS 3300 History and Significance of Black Pop Culture-1906 to Present
AFS 3350 Research Procedures in Africana Studies
AFS 3400 African and African American Cinema
AFS 3500 Blacks in Michigan
AFS 3600 Black Woman-Black Man Relationships
AFS 3700 Black Historical Movements/Moments
AFS 3800 Special Topics in Africana Literature and Culture
AFS 3880 Introduction to African Civilization
AFS 4000 Blacks in the Arts
AFS 4100 Bridging the African Diaspora in the New Millennium: An Interdisciplinary Approach
AFS 4650 Internship/Seminar
AFS 4860 Africa and the Slave Trade
AFS 4980 Directed Independent Study

AFS 2350 Black Majorities in the Caribbean and Latin America
3 hrs

This course will review basic (social history) literature from the Caribbean, Central and South America to determine the impact of Black majorities a) on the societies, b) on construction of collective identities, c) on memories that mobilize them, and d) on processes of making community despite displacement. These questions will be put to a representative territory from each language group in the Americas to discuss unequal power relations that can then be compared to USA/Canada.

AFS 3070 Poetics and Politics of Gender in Islam
3 hrs

This seminar course takes a historical and literary approach to the politics of gender in the Islamic traditions of Africa and the Middle East and conceptualizes the voices of Muslim women through narrative discourses.

AFS 3140 The Black Community
3 hrs

An investigation of the social forms and structures within the Black community from the unique Black perspective. The course will focus on the sociological, political, economic, psychological, health, and physical aspects of community building by a subordinated group.

AFS 3150 The Underground Railroad in the Midwest
3 hrs

During the mid to late 19th century, Calhoun County, Mich. was an active human rights center. This area was one stop on the Central Michigan route of the Underground Railroad. Slaves would begin their journey in one of the upper southern states, and go from stop to stop, ultimately reaching "their Canaan lands." There was a large group who participated in this pursuit of freedom for the enslaved Africans. They were considered subversive fanatics by slaveholders and righteous reformers by others. The aim of this class is the examination of the Underground Railroad system and the people involved. Of particular interest will be the role played by Michiganders in this freedom movement.

AFS 3300 History and Significance of Black Pop Culture-1906 to Present
3 hrs

This course will focus on the continuum of Black Pop Culture in the twentieth century, its development stages and its emergence as the nucleus of Pop Culture in "mainstream" America. Students will survey Black theatre, art, music, and literature in twentieth-century America and study the institutions, persons, sites, and traditions that it inspired.

AFS 3500 Blacks in Michigan
3 hrs

A survey of the significance of Blacks in the making of Michigan history. We will trace the movement of Blacks into Michigan; investigate patterns of settlement, reactions to the émigrés, and the development of the Black families and church as principal forces in the Black community. We will study the political, social, and economic implications of being Black in Michigan, both the urban and rural areas from 1790 to the present. The student will be introduced to the varieties of historical sources available for such study.